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Old Mar 10, 2004, 3:49 PM   #11
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Default D70 V 8700

I've been trying to compile a comparative chart and I have a few points to add:


1. You can create a customized menu. I haven't been able to verify that you can do that with the D70.

2. There's no manual focus on the 8700, whereas there are on the lenses you'd put on the D70.

3. Turn on for the 8700 is 3.4 sec, whereas the D70 is instant on (clarification), although I'm not sure that 3.4 sec. is a problem.

4. CCD chip on the D70 is .93 inches vs. the 8700's .667 inches.

5. More LCD pixels in the 8700 (134,000 vs. 130,000)

6. I'm not sure yet about shutter lag. The one review that I read said that it wasn't noticeable. I need to go play with an 8700 to see if I agree because that's the one issue that I did notice on a friend's digicam. I moved the camera between the time I hit the shutter release and the time the camera did its thing.

All that said quantitatively, let me add a few observations. We're not comparing dollars v. dollars. For me (my existing Nikkor lenses aren't compatible with the D70), I'll have to shell out close to $1500 for the D70 vs. $1000 for the 8700. I don't have a need to shoot more frames/sec. than the 8700 allows. In fact, the 8700 in multiple burst does more frames/sec than I've ever shot (no, I don't own a motor drive).

I was at a security meeting at the White House in 1990, ironically on the day that President Reagan came back from the first summit meeting with Soviet Prime Minister Gorbachev. During the day I had been taking some shots of various security issues that we needed to address. Because I knew I'd be on the go all day, instead of grabbing my solid steel (kidding) F3 and heading out the door, I took my pocketable Nikon Tele Touch. The latter had a two focal length lens: either 35 or 70mm.

So while Marine One's landing on the South Lawn, I'm standing there taking shot after shot. As the President emerged from the helicopter, I'm still shooting and flash through a roll just as he enters the White House. The photo of Pres. Reagan coming out of Marine One hangs in my house today. Had I not had that little Tele Touch, that wouldn't be the case.

I think therefore, that size does matter if (and only if) it's going to be a determining factor in whether or not the camera goes with me. The 8700 weighs a scant one pound. The D70 with Nikon's lightest zoom (70-200 roughly) weighs in at over twice that. I'm sure that either makes my F3 with old 80-200 look like an anchor.

So have I reached a conclusion yet? Nope. Given that I've barraged Nikon for the past couple of weeks, if I don't figure out which I'm going to buy, they'll probably send me one of each just to make ME go away!
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Old Mar 10, 2004, 4:27 PM   #12
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Default Re: D70 V 8700

Quote:
Originally Posted by rabsparks
I've been trying to compile a comparative chart and I have a few points to add:

2. There's no manual focus on the 8700, whereas there are on the lenses you'd put on the D70.
I'm sure others will leap on this too but ...

Not as easy to use as a DSLR but manual focus is available on the 8700. http://www.steves-digicams.com/2004_...700.html#specs
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Old Mar 10, 2004, 5:33 PM   #13
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Okay. There is a manual focus on the 8700, but I'm not sure that anyone would use it since it's functionality differs soooooo greatly from what most would consider a "manual focus".

There's an option under "Focus Options" called "Focus confirmation" which shows what areas are in focus by outlining them. I don't see myself using it because it's alien from my 35mm slr experience where I do the focusing on the lens ring.
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Old Mar 10, 2004, 5:39 PM   #14
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Please, as you read my posts and comments, remember that I am trying to figure out which camera (8700 or D70) I should buy given that this is my first foray into digital photography, my experience in 35mm slr photography over the past 4 decades, and my personal assessment of what I'll most likely be doing with the camera once I get it.

I have no preference beyond that the word "Nikon" is on the camera. Why "Nikon"? Because I've used their equipment extensively over the years and I've been happy with it.

I sincerely doubt that the final factors which influence my purchase will be the same ones that influence someone else's. My purpose in sharing this experience is: 1. to draw comments from those of you who are more experienced with digital photography and have gone through this process already, 2. to show my "logic" to see if it is in some way defective, and 3. seeing my gyrations may help another newbie down the road.

rick
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Old Mar 10, 2004, 7:31 PM   #15
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Hi there,

You really need to try out both cameras and see which one you like better. If you don't care about putting on more lenses, and like the smaller lighter body, than go with the 8700. At the quality point of both, the difference in taking better pictures has to do with you, not the camera.
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Old Mar 10, 2004, 9:44 PM   #16
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I agree about trying out both cameras, which is something I'll inevitably do once the D70 comes out.

I also agree that taking better pictures is, for the most part, up to me and my "photographic" eye. In the early 70's I tripped off to Europe with a Leica M3/50mm lens and a Nikon FTn. I shot a ton of film, mostly with the 50mm lenses, came home, and wasn't thrilled about much of it.

Went back the following year with the Nikon/135mm lens and came back with photographs instead of snapshots. I realized that I had cluttered up my shots during the first trip, and that for me, a medium focal length telephoto was what I needed.

Later, I bought an 80-200/f4 zoom and that's been my mainstay over the years. The problem photographically speaking, is that when I started this electronics company in 1974, my shooting supported our marketing efforts. I was doing so much business related photography that I didn't pick up the camera for personal use much at all.

Over the last ten years, I've been shooting "snapshots" for the most part and probably would continue if the digital photobug hadn't bitten me. I'm looking forward to getting back into photography FOR ME this time.

Thanks for the advice.

rick
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Old Jun 22, 2004, 9:53 PM   #17
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If you've read my prior posts I don't think you are downsizing when going from the D100 to the 8700. The 8700 is an incredibly versatile camera - IMHO.

In addressing other posts here, I shoot at ISO 50 for a no noise look and I have experienced NO purple fringing in images.

An excellent piece of equipment from Nikon, once again.

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Old Jun 22, 2004, 10:01 PM   #18
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There is manual focus on the 8700. It's not a tradtional manual, but it does work. You will find yourself using this on occasion when the autofocus won't lock in certain (flower) subjects in Macro mode. The Manual focus comes in very handy then.

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