Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Nikon

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Aug 26, 2002, 6:24 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 46
Default 5700 vs 7i--An Amateurs Analysis

Iíve been looking for a comparison between the 5700 and 7i. I haven't found one, so I decided to go through the process myself. I'm posting this analysis in both the Minolta and Nikon forums.

A little background. I lead a VERY busy life. Between running a business and being actively involved in the lives of my four children, I donít have nearly enough time for the things I want to do, including photography. I consider myself an average to above average AMATEUR photographer. I've been interested in photography since High School, over 30 years ago, and I used to develop my own black and whites. I've had a Casio Qv-2000 for about 2 years and I edit my digital photos with Microsoft Picture It! 2000 (very easy to use and I LOVE the collage feature) or Photoshop Elements (gives me many more editing features).

I've been daunted by the prospect of choosing between these 2 cameras. There are so many features to consider. You can go crazy trying to analyze and compare all of the features and test results. Where do you start, how do you make a final decision?

I decided to think about only the things that would be most important to MY use of the camera. Here's my list, in no particular order:

1. Telephoto/wide angle lens parameters.
2. LCD/EVF quality and ease of use.
3. Image quality.
4. Manual controls & 'bells and whistles'.
5. Storage medium (size).


Both cameras have the same Compact Flash type I/II large, storage capabilities (which I think is critical) so number 5 is not an issue. I've made some assumptions that take care of numbers 3 and 4, and greatly simplify the scope of the analysis. Minolta and Nikon are both great companies that make great cameras, and these are two great cameras. Not being a professional photographer, I don't think I'll EVER notice the subtleties of the tests run by the likes of Phil Askey (though I really appreciate his reviews-as well as Steve's of course), so Iím sure that I will be thrilled with the image quality of either camera. Both cameras have all of the manual controls and B&H's that anyone at my level would ever want to use. I need to spend more time at the camera shop to get a sense of how each one has set up accessing all of their settings, but I trust that I'll learn the ropes quickly with either camera and once I know, getting what I want will become second nature. After my 2 megapixel,, 3X telephoto Casio, Iíll be in photo heaven with either camera!

Telephoto/wide angle lens -- I think that a large zoom lens is very important in giving me the most photographic flexibility possible. The 5700 has a larger zoom, but with 5 megapixels I believe that images from the 7i could be 'cropped up' to the missing magnification. On the other side, I often wish that my Casio QV-2000 went wider than 35 mm. I think that I would miss the 7i's 28 mm wide(r) angle lens.

LCD/EVF -- Both cameras have very good LCD/EVF's, although the 7i seemed a bit brighter in the camera store. I use the viewfinder way more often than I use the LCD, so I like the idea of the swiveling 7i EVF more than the 5700's swiveling LCD. I think that the 7i's larger LCD makes a difference, and the way the 7i automatically switches between the LCD and EVF when your eye approaches the EVF is WAY COOL!

Other factors Iím considering that didnít make the ítop 5í list:


1. The 5700 is smaller and lighter, but not enough to eliminate the 7i. I've handled both of them and they are both very comfortable. Someone with larger hands might actually like the 7i better.

2. I donít like having to open the flash manually on the 7i.
3. I like AA batteries (7i) better than proprietary batteries (5700).
4. Iím worried about the low-light effectiveness of the EVFís of both cameras.

5. Do I really want a manual wide angle/telephoto operation (7i) when I can push a button on the 5700? On the other hand, I have both hands on the camera anyway and the manual will save on batteries.

I like both cameras a lot!!! By the above analysis I'm leaning slightly towards the 7i, but I'm not quite there yet.

I look forward to reading other people's views, I need all of the help I can get in making this decision.

Jeff
Jeff Mirkin is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Aug 27, 2002, 2:05 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Klaus DK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 2,216
Default

Hi.
I suggest you read the "shootout" between CP5700 and D7i in the Nikon Review at this address:

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikoncp5700/

Theres a lot of photos to compare. You can download them and look for yourself.
Maybe you wont agree with Phil Askey, but its a really serious test.

In my opinion - if you buy the D7i you will miss the CP5700 and the other way around. Its all a matter of taste. Youll never be 100% satisfied. Theres allways something youll miss.
Klaus DK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 27, 2002, 9:43 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 610
Default

Quote:
Originally posted by Jeff Mirkin


1. The 5700 is smaller and lighter, but not enough to eliminate the 7i. I've handled both of them and they are both very comfortable. Someone with larger hands might actually like the 7i better.


YES, BUT IT'S MORE IMPORTANT TO SEE HOW WELL THE CAMERA FITS IN YOUR HAND. HOW STEADY YOU HOLD A VERY LIGHT CAMERA WHEN YOU'RE TAKING PICTURE?(THIS IS A VERY IMPORTANT ISSUE, ESPECIALLY MOST LENSES EQUIPPED WITH CONSUMER DIGITCAMS ARE NOT FAST LENSES)THE NIKON 5700 WITH THE OPTIONAL MB-E5000, IT WILL FIT PERFECTLY IN TO YOUR HAND AND CONTRIBUTE TO THE BALANCE WITH ADDITIONAL WEIGHTS.

2. I donít like having to open the flash manually on the 7i.

POP UP FLASH AUTOMATICALLY IS NOT ALWAYS THE WELCOME FEATURE IN THE CONSUMER DIGICAM, I RATHER LIKE TO CONTROL THIS FEATURE MYSELF THAN LET THE CAMERA DOES THAT FOR ME...(just my .02 cent on this, may not apply here on the 5700)

3. I like AA batteries (7i) better than proprietary batteries (5700).

THE NIKON 5700 HAVE THE OPTIONAL MB-E5700 USING AA BATTERIES FOR LONGER USING TIME. GREAT TOOL

4. Iím worried about the low-light effectiveness of the EVFís of both cameras.

I AGREE, YOU'LL NEVER HAVE THE EFFECTINESS OF EVF ANYWAY, IF THEY CAN REPLACE THEM WITH THE OPTICAL SLR VIEWFINDER, THAT'S GREAT

5. Do I really want a manual wide angle/telephoto operation (7i) when I can push a button on the 5700? On the other hand, I have both hands on the camera anyway and the manual will save on batteries.

YOU WILL NEED THAT MANUAL WIDE ANGEL LENS ADD ON TO BOTH CAMERA ANYWAY, BOTH DO NOT HAVE TRUE WIDE ANGLE LENS COVERAGE ANYWAY

THERE YOU HAVE IT, I THINK BOTH ARE GREAT CAMERAS, THEY BOTH WILL TAKE GREAT PICTURES (MOSTLY DEPEND ON YOU). THE DESIGN OF THE CAMERA MAY CONTRIBUTE SOME WEIGHTS TO YOUR BUYING DESICION. IF IT'S GONNA BE YOUR PERSONAL ASSET, GO WITH WHAT YOUR HEART TELL YOU TO DO :-))

PETER
[Edited on 8-27-2002 by [email protected]]

[Edited on 8-27-2002 by [email protected]]

[Edited on 8-27-2002 by [email protected]]
tuanokc@hotmail.com is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 27, 2002, 12:18 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Klaus DK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 2,216
Default

Peter:

The flash on CP5700 works full manual - look in the menus.

You can assign a button to make the flash pop up!
Klaus DK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 27, 2002, 3:54 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 298
Default

I nominate JEFF for a new amateur reviewer. His comparison seems to me to be right on the button!

The only sppecifics I will quibble with is the differences between 8x and 7x and the importance of the Minolta's ring around the lens.

Having 8x is considerably beter than 7x, in effect it gives you 12% more pixels. Even with 5mpix, another half a megapix ain't nothing.

The manual focusing mechanism on the Nikion is a major weakness vs. gthe Minolta esp since neither camera is any good in low light focusing.

I personally value a flexible LCD MUCH more than a tilting EVF ... trun using the Minolta by holding it over your head in a crowd scen or to alter perpective or for close ups on a table top! Also the greater fps of the Nikon makes its EVF work better.

Frankly, both cameras are evolutionary tries. The fine tuning is yet to come. I prefered and bought the Nikon because On hhave used Nikon cameras forn years (brand loyalty may = stupidity) and because i really prefer my cameras to be as physically small as possible. I really want a digi-Leica M3 or digi-oly-OM3!

LOL
Steves is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 3, 2002, 8:20 PM   #6
NHL
Senior Member
 
NHL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: 39.18776, -77.311353333333
Posts: 11,547
Default

Well Steves, it looks like you're in luck for your digi-oly-OM3, while officially discontinuing the OM3/4 lens line in 3/2003, Oly is preparing to introduce the "Olympus System Pro" in Photokina... it also sounds like they are mocking @ the Contax N Digital as well...
NHL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4, 2002, 12:10 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 298
Default a translation

*** "OLYMPUS SYSTEM PRO": the reflex camera pro arrives!
------------------------------------------------

One speaks about it since nearly two years and it almost became an as well nourished alarming spectre as the launching of Contax DIGITAL (do not laugh!): Olympus will reveal, during Photokina, its projects as regards numerical reflex camera.

Olympus Japan will present, in Cologne, the specifications of "olympus SYSTEM PRO ": a new concept of numerical reflex camera, based on a new bayonet and which will be built around an optical range developed especially for the numerical one.

---> All the Olympus sales leaflet will rest on only one hot line: the sensors very high resolution cannot give all their potential if they are not associated ultra-powerful objectives offering at the same time a high resolution and a very great luminosity < - - -

At the same time as its numerical reflex camera, Olympus will thus present several ultra-luminous teleobjectives and at very high resolution, resolutely directed towards the professional photograph, but numerically.

Olympus would also wish that its new bayonet becomes a standard and this is why the presentation, in Photokina, will prťcŤdera several months the effective introduction of OLYMPUS SYSTEM PRO on the market. If our information is exact, Olympus presented, in Cologne, a mock-up of its apparatus and several functional specimens of its objectives, but marketing will not intervendra before the summer 2002.

Increasingly persistent rumours also give a report on a collaboration between Olympus and Kodak concerning the CCC used by System Pro. These rumours are plausible: Olympus has strong need for partners and the support of Kodak would give to its future professional system an unquestionable credibility.

At all events, the Olympus stand of Cologne will be one of the points impossible to circumvent of Photokina... and we remain in day before.

To follow...
Steves is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4, 2002, 12:44 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
sjms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 2,735
Default

on the matter of the manual zoom versus pushbutton. its all a matter of taste but there are some minor advantages to the manual aspect
feel- (opinion) your more coupled to the camera it feels more like an slr. zoom as fast or as slow as you need. tweaking is easier.
durability- design of the manual zoom is such that taking a hit on the lens from the front collapses the helical back with a better chance of survivability. of course you would have a uv filter on the 49mm threaded front end to further protect the front element from such accidental assauts plus to use circ polarizers and other creative filters.
(opinion) the pushbutton zoom is of a precision rack/pinion motorized assembly. do the same as above to it and i feel the survivability is considerably lower. plus there is no easy protection for the front element since no filter threads exist.

peter-as to both do not have true wide angles lens coverage. the 7i has a lot more then the 5700 just as the 5700 has more tele

low light effectiveness on the 7i evf/lcd- it goes b&w and boosts so you can use it more effectively in lower light.

battery issue- why should i have to buy a nikon battery($35) if i don't want to purchase/use their an external battery pack($?)?

open the flash manually- i don't know what to say about that one. both flashes when out have very limited output(8-12 ft). i would be thinking of another external strobe if i were going to seriously do flash work. again the 5700 is rather limited in that option where as the 7i is considerablty more flexible and system oriented.

"since neither camera is any good in low light focusing".
the low light focusing on my 7i is quite good in a lot of situations. it surprises me sometimes.

i could go into more detail but klaus DK said it best:
In my opinion - if you buy the D7i you will miss the CP5700 and the other way around. Its all a matter of taste. Youll never be 100% satisfied. Theres allways something youll miss.

[Edited on 9-4-2002 by sjms]
sjms is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4, 2002, 1:14 AM   #9
Member
 
SteveC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 49
Default

I had to choose between the Nikon 5700, Minolta 7i and Sony's F707; I wanted decent zoom capability.
My choice was very unscientific; the sony lens was too big and just waiting to be smacked into something, Minolta required software to properly render the images, Nikon won, simple.
I thought I would miss the AA batteries but so far I love Nikon's EN's, keep a couple with you and you will always have power.
SteveC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4, 2002, 6:25 AM   #10
NHL
Senior Member
 
NHL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: 39.18776, -77.311353333333
Posts: 11,547
Default

Steves

... Et voila un autre francophone!


To add to sjms and to SteveC comment: The D7i does not need software to convert its output picture from the wider gamut put out by the D7 (which some people might actually prefer). But surely the 'Direct Manual Focusing' overide in AF and the real-time histogram of the Minolta's are real pluses that one sees other manufacturers start now to emulate like the new Sony's F717... (we'll see if they'll offer an upgrade a` la Minolta for their former F707 customers...)

The EN-EL1 won't be missed until one acquires a microdrive, that's when the extra capacity of the AA is needed. The NiMh is more suitable since it doubles the power for the extra current required by the MD.

[Edited on 9-4-2002 by NHL]
NHL is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 4:31 AM.