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Old Nov 20, 2004, 11:54 PM   #1
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I've just purchased a the Nikon 8800 and took it out for a test run, shooting in NYC outdoors in daylight. I was just thrilled with the camera until I noticed quite a bit of this purple fringing-- on some 80% of the shots.

I am a newcomer to this forum, and to this "prosumer" category of digicams-- and my head is spinning with all the research I've been doing in the past couple of hours on this-- maybe someone on this forum can help? I've attached a corner of the worst offender. Granted, the shot is that kind that generally will produce this kind of noise, but it seems to be particularly bad...

Steve's review of the 8700 notes this problem, but doesn't make it sound unacceptable, and Nikon also says this is normal. So:

1. Is there something I might be doing wrong? Some setting, or must I simply avoid taking this kind of shot?

2. Is there a plug-in that could help? I have only found one for PCs so far-- and I've got a Mac.

3. Might another manufacturer's cameras have similar features with better noise control? I had contemplated purchasing the Canon G6, but was seduced by the 10x zoon, the higher MPs and the vibration reduction feature.

4. Has anyone else had this trouble? I've seen lots of posts, especially about the CP 8700, but it doesn't sound bad enough to be a deal-breaker for anyone else.

Thanks-- I anxiously await your help, as I only have a day or two more that I can return it.
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Old Nov 21, 2004, 12:56 AM   #2
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Welcome to the forum, new_girl

Were you shooting into the sun by any chance?

That can make purple fringing worse I am told.
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Old Nov 21, 2004, 1:30 AM   #3
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Hi digcamfan,

Thanks for your welcome!

It was overcast. Someone somewhere posted something about bright overcast days and branches against the sky pretty much guaranteeing purple fringe. So that's my luck on this image, but I also had a similar effect on others when I wasn't aiming skyward.

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Old Nov 21, 2004, 10:22 PM   #4
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Hi. I have an 8800 and have not seen any evidence of this purple problem. All my shots have surprised me with the clarity and colour. I can only assume there is a bug in yours. I wouldn't hesitate to return it. This is a new model and as I've learned with new model cars, they sometimes release them without a 100% track record. Nikon Canada has a 2 year warranty on this model. I wondered if this indicated some doubt ?

Good luck...be assertive !

Steve
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Old Nov 26, 2004, 2:06 PM   #5
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Purple fringing (CA - Chromatic Aberration) is a known phenomenon but as far as I can understand, it's worse with digital cameras than film. Lens design has an effect but there are other contributing (compounding) issues such as the sensor itself which is explained quite well here - http://www.pictureline.com/newsletter/2004/july/purplefringe.html

I currently use a Fuji S602 which I have been very pleased with & to my surprise this too exhibits CA under similar conditions - branches & leaves against the sky. Looking to upgrade my S602, I've looked at a considerable number of reviews & checked out the Nikon 8700 previously.

Notwithstanding the potential improvements of an more up-market camera, the S602 has a lot of features that makes it hard to beat for all round performance especially it's macro capability and most importantly, it's 27 focus zone points that allows focusing on virtually any specific point in the viewfinder; the Nikon 8800 is the best camera that I have found to date that provides these feature - albeit only 9 focusing points.

I've just run a few shots through the Nikon 8800 at my local store as I am concerned about the CA effect. All with the exception of one scene were great BUT shooting away from the sun on a dullish day, produced this effect in objects on or near the skyline - see attached image & section that I've blown up showing CA around the edge of window frames & section of the roof.

The bottom line is that no camera will eliminate CA completely so it's down to the user to determine if it's acceptable or not. Quite honestly, I never knew that my S602 had CA until I started reading these forums and saw the effect at this url http://www.pbase.com/johnizat/image/34997870. When you first look at the image, it appears fine but the viewer's comments encourages you to zoom in and the effect of CA becomes noticeable.

The image that I shot & posted here was printed on A5 paper and looks great. When viewed on the screen, it also looks great. It only starts to look bad when you blow it up and look for CA.

Am I convinced that the Nikon 8800 is the camera for me - well not quite yet. None of my local dealers will allow me a purchase that I can return if I am unsatisfied and at UK £700 it's a gamble that I'm not prepared to take. I will have to remain patient and study the reviews from this site and DP Review before finally deciding.
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Old Dec 1, 2004, 10:41 AM   #6
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Hi Steve the Scubbler, thanks for your advice to exchange the camera, which the store did without any issues. Under similar conditions this second 8800 does not produce such bright and aggressive CA. It's still there if you look for it, but the results are more in line with Catbell's evaluation, and for me, falls within the range of acceptable. I've been using the camera for a graphic design thesis (mostly urban landscapes) and am otherwise very extremely pleased with my new toy.
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Old Dec 1, 2004, 12:05 PM   #7
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Hi. I'm very pleased you exchanged the camera without issue. I wonder if they will just sell it to some unsuspecting customer and hope for no complaint ? It's a lot of money to pay for something you aren't happy with.

I bought a Sony Digi Camcorder a while ago. The picture quality was terrible and it refused to download to my computer and even mentioned in it's manual that a box would appear saying it was not compatible, but to ignore it. About 5 "experts" in the store came over to tell me "it should work". None had ever tried and knew nothing of any software conflicts. I was actually quite angry when I left and vowed to not buy there again. So I bought the Coolpix elsewhere !

I hope you enjoy your new, new camera !

Steve
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