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Old Jun 22, 2002, 11:52 AM   #11
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Default Oh here is the free version...

Attached is the free version of the Short Course book so you can get an example of how the book is.
elterrible is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 22, 2002, 5:43 PM   #12
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Thanks elterrible for the book suggestion and link. It looks like a great book and I like that it also includes some Photoshop information. I use Photoshop and Illustrator professionally as well as for my personal projects.

Also, thanks for the words of encouragement in that the more I use the Coolpix 5000, the easier it will get. It appears to be a great camera.
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Old Jul 9, 2002, 10:22 PM   #13
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Default coolpix 5000

Don't worry about feeling overwhelmed by the menu. A friend I graduated with from RIT confessed to me that the night before going on a pro shoot using his Coolpix 995 he would go over the manual and rehearse using the menus(for manual controls, for examplt).
I've had my coolpix 950 for a year and a half and am up to 9,000 frames. I am just now getting to where it's mostly second nature.
try keeping file cards or a small notebook with notes on how to do the operations you will be using most.
Happy shooting.
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Old Jul 10, 2002, 9:23 AM   #14
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Default Different issues

I think you are confusing very different issues.

One is the complexity of the menu structure in these cameras. There is an obvious and great need for human factors development there!

The other is photography of small objects. This would be no different with a digital camera than with any other camera. Critical issues are:

1. depth of field. To get better depth field you need either to use a longer foacl length to compress the image or move closer and use a small aperture. In either case the small paerture will increase depth of field. To get a small paerture you may need to use manual exposure.

2. perpective. natural perpspective in a 35 mm camera happens at about 75 mm. Using a wider zoom .. esp in close up, will exagerate an objects shape, a longer zoom will compress it.

3. blur. Esp with a small aperture, exposures get long. You will need a copying stand or tripod.

4. lighting. Avoid flash. You will do much better either workiong outdoors in the sun or using lights. Flash is difficult to use withut guide lights since you can not see what isd going to be in the picture.

Lighting small objects is the key to giving them depth and is, again, not specific to digital photography.

I think you are confusing very different issues.

One is the complexity of the menu structure in these cameras. There is an obvious and great need for human factors development there!

The other is photography of small objects. This would be no different with a digital camera than with any other camera. Critical issues are:

1. depth of field. To get better depth field you need either to use a longer focal length to compress the image or move closer and use a small aperture. In either case the small aperture will increase depth of field. To get a small aperture you may need to use manual exposure.

2. perspective. natural prospective in a 35 mm camera happens at about 75 mm. Using a wider zoom .. esp in close up, will exaggerate an objects shape, a longer zoom will compress it.

3. blur. Esp with a small aperture, exposures get long. You will need a copying stand or tripod.

4. lighting. Avoid flash. You will do much better either working outdoors in the sun or using lights. Flash is difficult to use without guide lights since you can not see what is going to be in the picture.

Lighting small objects is the key to giving them depth and is, again, not specific to digital photography.

Hope this helps!
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Old Jul 10, 2002, 7:44 PM   #15
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Default Nikon Coolpix 5000 Question

Sweetcraver

Thank you for your reassuring words. The notebookidea is great.

Louise Parrish
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Old Jul 10, 2002, 8:16 PM   #16
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Default Coolpix 5000 Question

Steves

Thanks for the great info.

Louise Parrish
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Old Aug 21, 2002, 9:42 AM   #17
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Default

There wasn't any issue with the Nikon 5K manual, I used the menu features in the camera and have no problem whatsoever, most of times I don't even need nthe manual at all. I think if you get confuse with any direction of using any function of the camera, just post the question in this forum, I'm sure someone will be able to help. Just my .02 cents...
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