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Old Jan 16, 2006, 1:22 AM   #1
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I have an 8800. I am a novice user and want to take pictures of my 18 month old toddler. I am finding that many of my shots are coming out unfocused and sometimes it seems the camera actually focuses on something in the background of the shot and not my child. I am also working in marginal light conditions. Have I purchased the wrong camera? What settings should I choose? I feel like Iam missing a lot of great shots.
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Old Jan 17, 2006, 12:01 PM   #2
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You have to configure the autofocus such that it selects from 9 fields the one which is closest to the lense. Unfortunately this autofocus mode is slower. In general the Nikon 8800 is an excellent camera, but a little bit slow.
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Old Jan 19, 2006, 2:25 PM   #3
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I've had my 8800 for over a year and find that indoor flash shots in low light are a weak point. I rarely shoot in these situations and so it's not really an issue for me. The results I've had with the zoom and macro make the camera worth the investment, but I still use my 3MP Kodak on the rare times I shoot indoors. If you still can, it may be an idea to return the camera and try something else ifflash shots areof majorinterest. I know the store I bought minefrom has a good return policy with a guarantee of customer satisfaction. I'm no expert, but wonder if any camera provides great results in all situations. My humble opinion of the 8800 is that it is best suited to stills outdoors where the zoom and macro can provide really detailed results.

Good luck !



Steve
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Old Jan 19, 2006, 3:15 PM   #4
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Thanks Steve, but I doubt if the store where I purchased it will take it back. I've had it quite a few months. I am thinking of buying another digital for indoor/low light conditions.
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Old Jan 19, 2006, 9:52 PM   #5
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Hi. I don't think you have wasted your money...even if you buy a simple camera for flash shots. I've been an avid photographer since 1968 and still have a suitcase full of old Nikon film cameras and lenses. I can't really comment technically on digital cameras, and have been chastized in the past for doing so, but I still think the 8800 is an excellent camera. I think you'll find it limited in indoor light, but it seems to work well in low outside lighting.I live on the West coast of Canada and we have a lot of cloudy weather. I've still had great shots in this light and even great close ups in the gloomy forests. In full sunlight, the results are, in my opinion, fantastic. There are many who will argue, but I know what I like to see. My screensaver is a variety of shots I took last year and the clarity and colour are up to the Nikon standards and Kodachrome slides I used to use. If you can afford a smaller digital, I find it a good second, as the Coolpix is a wee bit bulky to carry in all situations. I find I just "snap" pics with the Kodak, but feel more serious with the 8800.

I know you are anxious to capture the little one while still little, but really feel if you use the Nikon, you may get the best results outside. I've taken a lot of shots of my dawgs (I'm too homely for kids), but the flash shots have been poor. The outdoor shots show EVERY hair, which explains the clogged mass in my vacuum cleaner !

I'm sure you can find a cheap and superior mini digital via this website. I really feel any serious digital photographer would like a "big" camera and a shirt pocket sized mini for those "snapshots". But again, only my personal opinion.

Regards, Steve
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Old Jan 20, 2006, 2:08 AM   #6
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Hi moma4faith and Steve,

I have to say that I agree with Steve, I too love my coolpix 8800. You might find in the summer that you can take excellent photos outside, when your toddler plays in the sand and in deep concentration. I have taken loads of photos of my sisters kids, they are a little bit older. Don't rule the 8800 out.

With a small second camera you should be absolutely fine.

Greetings from Angie
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Old Jan 20, 2006, 10:43 PM   #7
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Does anyone have any recommendations as to what kind of "second" camera I should look at. I may start a separate post for this...thanks y'all.
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Old Jan 21, 2006, 12:39 AM   #8
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Moma,

I have an 8800 and also recognize the limitations on indoor shots with low light. Let me ask you if you have set the focus options in the menu to "AF area mode". This should put 9 little brackets on your view screen with your subject behind them. You put the red one on what you want the camera to focus and half depress the shutter button to see if the camera will auto focus for you. This is about all you can do short of turning on more lights.

I have the SB800 flash for mine but have not figured out how to use it functionally.

Let me know if it works or if I can help more.

Bill
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Old Jan 21, 2006, 3:36 PM   #9
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I purchased a Nikon CoolPix 8400 in December. I'm also a novice user. From what I've read the settings and picture-taking methods are very similar to the 8800.* I've been fascinated with taking macro shots since my purchase so haven't explored any other settings. This thread had me concerned about the camera's capabilities of taking pictures of my doll collection spread around my house; some are life-like baby and toddler-sized.











The dolls are in room-situations like a toddler would explore; curtains open and closed, in a high chair in a darkened corner of my kitchen and behind a chair on the floor of a dark den, in bedrooms with different lighting, etc.*













For the first time I switched my scene mode from macro to portrait, enabled the flash and took about twenty pictures without changing any of the lighting conditions. My camera is still set at the factory settings with only the saturation setting having been changed. Every picture is beautiful, sharp, and showing details of the dolls I've never noticed. Granted, the dolls aren't moving, but I'm even more in love with this camera now. Guess I should get off that macro setting and see how this camera performs.













I'm going to a baby shower tomorrow and maybe there will be some real children there and I'll have the opportunity to take some pictures. I'll leave the settings where they are. I hope this information has helped in some way.

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Old Jan 21, 2006, 3:40 PM   #10
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Sorry, I can't seem to fix what I did wrong in the above post.
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