Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital Cameras (Point and Shoot) > Nikon

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Feb 4, 2006, 5:58 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 2
Default

I've got a Nikon coolpix 4300, last night a friend of mine managed to dump it in, of all places, a big bowl of water. I reacted immediately; got it out, removed the battery (although it went off immediately) and tried my best to dry it off, I'm leaving it aside for now and will do so for a week to make sure it is completely dry before I try to turn it back on again.



My gut feeling tells me it's finished, probably burnt, but I'm hopeful that if I give it a bit of time to dry off if it is wet inside that it'll work. I wanted to see if anyone here would know out of experience whether or not is stands a chance of working again, or if it could be fixed? Problem is we don't have those special centers specialized in fixing cameras either.



Any suggestions?
Natalie79 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Feb 4, 2006, 10:33 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 448
Default

After such a bath the survival chances are very low. You need much more than a week to get it really dry, because in many the humidity can hardly evaporate. I would look for a new camera and take this a costly lesson to be more careful in the future.
kassandro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 4, 2006, 2:26 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 804
Default

Too bad that the camera was on when it got dunked. That lessens the chances of recovery. Open up any doors/panels that it has and set it on a sunny window sill or on the floor of your car out of direct sun -- if your car is parked in the sun. Give it a few days and then put it in a ziplock plastic bag and put it back in the sun. If there is still moisture in the camera it will evaporate into the bag and be visible. When the plastic bag stays clear and dry inside, try the camera out. If you've lead a virtuous life, it might just work again.

Should you fix it? A study by Consumer Reports came to following conclusions:

With 4-5 megapixel cameras, repair was recommended within the first year; repair should be "considered" from years 2-5; after year 5, replace.

Average replacement costs: $350 - 650. Average repair cost: $135 - 270. Percent of repairs with problems: 61%.

Digital cameras were also found to have one of the highest ratios of repair cost to purchase price.

Grant
granthagen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 4, 2006, 4:38 PM   #4
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 2
Default

granthagen wrote:
Quote:
>...set it on a sunny window sill
Quote:
>...if your car is parked in the sun
Quote:
>...put it in a ziplock plastic bag and put it back in the sun.


Sun…now…in the middle of February. I haven't seen "sun" in days. would it be wrong if i put it slightly close to a heater while making sure it doesn't get warm?


By now my "hopeful" feeling just went as grey as the sky outside. Great. Never the less I'll try, and thanks for the reply, REALLY… I would have never thought of the sun bit.

Natalie79 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 4, 2006, 11:06 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
The Scubbler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 294
Default

Natalie, I wouldn't despair yet ! I've managed to fill previous electronic Nikon film cameras with orange juice and beer. No need to explain why...just dumb, I guess ! In both cases, a week of airing with all orifices (the camera's !) as open as possible, proved to dry the camera enough to allow normal function. These newer digitals may be more sensitive, so be prepared to chuck it out. There are many new cameras out now with lots of features at what seem low prices, so if you have to, maybe it's just time to "move up".

Best of luck, clumsy Steve
The Scubbler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 5, 2006, 7:58 AM   #6
E.T
Senior Member
 
E.T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 921
Default

Natalie79 wrote:
Quote:
Sun…now…in the middle of February. I haven't seen "sun" in days. would it be wrong if i put it slightly close to a heater while making sure it doesn't get warm?
Living somewhere north?
(or propably south when looked from here)

Sunlight isn't necessary... actually if you leave something dark to sunlight it can get very hot which doesn't do good.
Propably best place would be warm (not hot) place where there's slight airflow.
Above heater (but not touching it or so that camera feels warmer than hand) could be quite good place, air warmed by heater has lower relative humidity so it should make drying more effective and rising warmer air causes airflow.



PS. Don't use "text formatting" just because those are there, constantly changing text color, font/size just makes text look disordered.
E.T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 6, 2006, 4:56 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 804
Default

The heater thing sounds okay. Anywhere that the camera can get some heat to make it warmer than the surrounding air. Even a goose-neck lamp with a 60 watt bulb can heat it up.

Let us know if it works!

Grant
granthagen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 26, 2006, 3:26 PM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1
Default

Hey I was wondering if the sunlight and heat worked to fix your camera? Two nights ago I fell on ice and beer got all over my Kodak EasyShare CX7530 camera which will now not turn on. I placed it in the sunlight but I wanted to check if it worked for your camera or if you found another way to fix your camera. Please help meI don't want to lose my camera or have to pay to get it fixed!!! Thanks so much to anyone who could help!
debbadoo42 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 27, 2006, 11:58 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
The Scubbler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 294
Default

Don't despair ! Beer...been dere, done dat !!! Remove the batteries and memory card and open anything you can and use a hairdryer on the LOW heat setting and lower air blast to remove any remaining brew, but gently. Asbeer may dry to a goopy residue, you have to get at it quickly. I did the same with a Nikon 35MM camera with electronics and actually rinsed it in water first. After several days over the exhaust heat vent of my trailer's fridge, life returned!

I guess you must face the reality that a short may have fried something and moisture may be where it can't be removed. I doubt it would be cost efficient, or possible, to have it professionally "repaired".

Good luck, Steve ( I've also had an orange juice incident, and that ended up OK as well).
The Scubbler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 28, 2006, 12:17 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
digcamfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 3,422
Default

Hi Natalie,

I echo the sentiments of Scubbler.

Do open all doors on your Nikon and leave them open.

Do not place in plastic bag as this will just trap any humidity remaining in the camera.

Rotate your camera (place on its side, back, lens, etc) for several days ending each day with doors open and down.

Good luck

FYI, you can purchase a better dig cam now than what you paid for your nikon way back when...

House/renters insurance may be an option?
digcamfan is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:37 AM.