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-   -   E-510 and night time (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/olympus-dslr-40/e-510-night-time-166561/)

Andy c Feb 22, 2010 10:59 AM

E-510 and night time
 
Hi

I have the Olympus e-510 and while it seems a lovely camera and does what I want it to do during the day time..
My problems seems to start in the dark or low light situations, when it get to dark the camera really struggles to take a picture and the flash go on and on and on with the 7/8 extremely quick flashes make a adjustment and go again and again and in the end it can sometimes take over 40 seconds for 1 picture ,this is for a room to open areas and also I'm looking thought the eye piece as normally you can't see anything on the screen mode by that time
Is this just down to the small flash and bigger flash is needed or is there something in the programming that can be done ,as I have played a lot with the flash settings but nothing seems to work
can anyone help please

thanks for your time

shoturtle Feb 22, 2010 11:08 AM

The e-510 is a older 4/3 sensor. It will give you good performance up to 800iso only.

Which flash are you using? The built is flash is not that good, an external flash would do a much better job. And it will let you bring the iso back to to say 400iso.

JimC Feb 22, 2010 1:02 PM

Andy:

Can you explain exactly what you're trying to take a photo of, and what mode you're using to take it with?

A photo at night is going to require very slow shutter speeds for proper exposure (think Tripod) unless you can use a flash and stay within the rated flash range. If you try to use something like Night Portrait mode, it will assume you're taking a "Cityscape" type of photo and expose for the background (meaning a very slow shutter speed), firing the flash to expose the foreground. That's not what you want to do in most cases.

If you're just trying to take People type photos, one of the Auto type modes is properly a better bet. But, you'll need to be relatively close to your subjects for proper exposure (since your flash range is going to be limited), unless you increase ISO speed (which will increase noise levels).

If you're trying to take photos of stationary subjects, you'll probably want to disable the flash and use a tripod with a lower ISO speed (which will require longer exposure times).

IOW, the way you want to approach the problem is going to depend what you're trying to take photos of. I'd give more details for better responses and suggestions.

Mikefellh Feb 23, 2010 3:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy c (Post 1055755)
when it get to dark the camera really struggles to take a picture and the flash go on and on and on with the 7/8 extremely quick flashes make a adjustment and go again and again and in the end it can sometimes take over 40 seconds for 1 picture

This is the autofocus assist illuminator feature...if there isn't enough light for the camera to focus it will light up the scene by pulsating the internal flash. If you have an FL-36 or FL-50 external flash attached, it will shine a red beam instead.

In order to autofocus you have to look for obvious areas of contrast, which is tougher in lower light. You may have to learn how to manual focus instead if there isn't enough light.

The camera is very capable of doing low light photography *IF* you put in some learning and learning the limitations/laws of photography. Just as an example here is a link to an image which I shot with the E-330 at ISO100 for 2.5 seconds:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/08...streetfest.jpg

Unfortunately there's no magic answer.

Andy c Feb 23, 2010 6:40 AM

thanks for all the replies
Just a example is were were in a pub during the day and the lighting wasn't that great inside ,I was trying to take a photo of my sister in laws baby from about 1/2 meters away and the flash just kept on pulsating and focusing flashing focus flashing focus it must have done it 4/5 times (it was with the cameras flash as well) so I gave up and used a mobile camera oh and it's usually in automatic mode


In my defence I have always had the usual point and shoot cameras ,this is my first real camera and I know I have a lot to learn that's why I found this site to see if I can get some help and advice to learn

so
thanks again

TekiusFanatikus Feb 23, 2010 11:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy c (Post 1056245)
oh and it's usually in automatic mode

Do you know what you just said? I suggest you find a shelter... and HIDE! LOL!

Seriously though, I would only suggest that you do like you said and simply learn your camera enough to get out of automatic mode. Most people shoot in aperture "A" or shutter "S" priority most of the time.

I would say, at worst in "P" mode. It enables you to pick a lot of settings that get you further than automatic IMO (ie. ISO, exposure, ect...)

And, you might want to consider looking at auto focus points too, which by picking one specific AF point, you can increase the AF speed (as opposed to having the camera decide which one to take).

I'm sure others will chime in and have a better way to explain all this :)

Andy c Feb 23, 2010 5:07 PM

yeah i thought that would be the reaction are there any good websites out there that are good for beginners I've looked at loads and they all say different things

Tullio Feb 23, 2010 7:19 PM

One of the greatest advantages of digital photography is that you can take pictures till your heart's content w/o having to spend an extra penny (besides the initial cost of the memory card, of course). There are books written as guides to many camera brands/models but they are not much better than the User's manual that comes with cameras. So, I suggest you don't spend a dime on them. Instead, get the Oly manual, get your camera and start reading page by page. As you go through the settings, play with the camera, see what it does. You don't even have to take notes because the camera records tons of information about the image in the Exif data. So, once you upload your images to your computer, you can check every picture, pick the ones you like and check the exif data to find out the ideal settings. The best way to learn is to experiment. As a suggestion about the flash, turn AF assist OFF. There's nothing more irritating than having the flash firing each time you half press the shutter release to focus in low light. And, it's much worse if you are photographing people because they think once the flash has fired that the picture has been taken while in fact it was just for focusing purposes. They get irritated as well. IMO, that's a very primitive, pathetic and poor implementation of AF assist. You'd be better off without it (even if it takes you a bit longer to get the camera to lock focus). Once AF assist is turned OFF, the flash will fire only if you have it set to do so when the actual photo is being taken.

Andy c Feb 24, 2010 2:36 AM

thanks I have been playing with the setting and taking photo's, I suppose just not enough as I just don't understand what they all do and to be honest I haven't read the manual back to back only when I don't understand something ...Suppose I will get out there this summer and take a load more and really enjoy the camera this year and learn as you say it doesn't cost you anything

tkurkowski Feb 24, 2010 8:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy c (Post 1056529)
yeah i thought that would be the reaction are there any good websites out there that are good for beginners I've looked at loads and they all say different things

Andrzej Wrotniak's site has a lot of good information on Oly DSLRs.

www.wrotniak.net/photo/index.html

He's a physicist and so he can get way farther down in the technical weeds than you may need, but it's worth you taking a look.

Ted


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