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Old Sep 24, 2006, 4:38 AM   #1
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any and all help required an more imporntantly , new E1 user in need of professional help or a hammer.



three words, EXPosure exposure exposure. what gives with this thing, 10 shots at same subject with exact same settings and 3 out of ten either too dark or overblown?



PLEASE Help
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Old Sep 24, 2006, 7:14 AM   #2
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Perhaps a posted photoof what you a seeing? What lens you're using? Setting (M,S,A,P)? ISO setting? Are you bracketing? Indoors or outdoors? Using a flash?Without additional info it's a little like asking "There's a strange noise under the hood of my car; what is it?"

Lots of E-1 users out here willing to offer advice but we need a little more to go on.


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Old Sep 24, 2006, 10:34 AM   #3
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Hi Pete

I'm a new E1 user too, about 6 weeks and I've experienced the same problem esp 3 weeks ago in Epping Forest where I wasn;t able to get the correct exposure no matter what I did and ended up using the FZ10 which hit the nail right on the head first time.

Personnaly, I'm just using spot metering now as I've found that to be pretty accurate compared to ESP or centre weighted and making sure that I'm either dead on or -2/3 EVF. The best thing you can do is post a couple of shots and let the guys and girls here help you from there - I'd love to but until I've spent more time with the E1 don;t think I'm qualified at all.

Cheers

HarjTT

:O


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Old Oct 1, 2006, 5:15 PM   #4
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thanks guys, i will post a sample of photos as soon as i am back home from travelling
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Old Oct 1, 2006, 11:47 PM   #5
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Even with all the Firmwareupdates, both the E-300 and the E-1 that I own have tendencies to underexpose at the slightest hint of highlights when used in ESP metering mode. Each maker has their own specifications when it comes to multi-segment metering, and the bottom line is we have no idea what's being given priority when you allow the camera to control the point(s) being given priority in an image you are creating. You control everything else... focusing, composition, why not control what's being metered?

I have correctedmy problemby simply shooting in centerweighted metering now so I know what the meter is concentrating on and I can utilized exposure lock and nail the right exposure almost without fail, even in tough backlit or large tonal range sceneslike the imagebelow I took today at the Texas State Fair. This image is about as good as one can do short of using a tripod, making multiple images at differing exposures and then combining them later in Photoshop for the "perfect"image, and I hate tripods!In this case, a slight adjustment in the curves function within Capture One at the time I processed the RAW file was all that was needed to bring up the detail within the shadows to what I wanted.

The 5% of the time I don't use centerweighted, I'm using spot. It works, you just need to point the meter at the "right" area to get what you want. As long as you know what's being metered, you can control it. Every one of the 1500+ images I shot in Paris with my E-300 in May, of which around 700 are posted on my website,were shot in either centerweighted or spot metering mode and the detail was in every one for me to adjust to the look I wanted.

Regarding the posted image, after I took it I examined the image on the LCD and could see little detail in the shadow area due to the brightness outside, but when I pulled the histogram up I could tell the detail was there, and that's all I needed to know. Never trust your eyes in the field when looking at an image on your LCD. Use the histogram. If it looks off one way or another and you have the time or chance, adjust your exposure accordingly and shoot it again. That's the beauty of digital- you don't have to wait to get the pictures back from the lab or to get home and view it on the monitorto find out if you "got it right".


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Old Oct 2, 2006, 5:00 AM   #6
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thanks for your help greg, it makes sense about the metering. My worry is that witht he C-5060 this was never an issue so i was alway lazy and used the ESP mode, but all the photos came out great..



back to practicing,



one other question? do you use capture one as the only tool?, ie do i need photoshop or som other program to have it doo all the raw proccessing an output to TIFF for printing at the lab?



thanks to evereyone:idea:
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Old Oct 2, 2006, 5:43 AM   #7
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The Olympus Viewer/Master (whichever came with your E-1) will handle the RAW. RawShooter Essentials 2005 is now available as freeware for download. You can do a web search on this.


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Old Oct 2, 2006, 8:24 AM   #8
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Peter Cercone wrote:
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thanks for your help greg, it makes sense about the metering. My worry is that witht he C-5060 this was never an issue so i was alway lazy and used the ESP mode, but all the photos came out great..



back to practicing,



one other question? do you use capture one as the only tool?, ie do i need photoshop or som other program to have it doo all the raw proccessing an output to TIFF for printing at the lab?



thanks to evereyone:idea:
I'm not surprised the C-5060 nailed exposures. Most digicams do. The amount of processing done by the camera is extensive and, in some models (Kodak), overbearing.Those are designed to work for anyone. Makers have to assume many users will be people with little to no desire to work images after they've pressed the shutter release. That's not the case with digital SLR's. Even JPEG internal processing in DSLR'sis on the light side. The few times I've shot JPEG I've always been able to improve the file with a little post processing, be it levels, curves or some added sharpening.

Everyone who shoots RAW definitely has a preferred method of processing the files. Many, many people use the Adobe Camera RAW found in Photoshop to do their RAW processing. I already had a couple of years worth of experience with Capture One with the Canon bodies I had used prior to buying my first Olympus DSLR body and have just continued using it because it does such a great job. I cannot duplicate the colors and overall file quality with Adobe that I get with C1.

I still use Photoshop for many things, like touching up files, collages and setting images up for 8.5x11 printing, such as these images that are cropped to print at 7.5x10 with no cropping on 8.5x11 paper:

http://gmchappell.smugmug.com/gallery/1908427

Otherwise, when I run an image through C1 it is finished, including sharpening. That's my workflow. There are probably 100,000 people who would either give you a different method or tell you I'm crazy to allow C1 to do everything, including sharpening, but it works for me and that's why digital is so good. Who cares if it's something everyone else does or not, as long as it works for you.


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