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Old Oct 6, 2006, 5:23 PM   #1
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Hi all !

I've seen quiet a few portraits taken with the 50mm f2.0 macro and some with the 35mm f3.5. I'm a wee bit confused why you'd want to use a macro lens for that kind of picture apart from the fast aperture in preference to say using the 14-54 or even the 50-200. Can someone explain why one would use the macro lens over one of the zoom's ?

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HarjTT

:O :?

PS.

Has anyone tried a closeup filter with say the 14-54 yet ??


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Old Oct 6, 2006, 5:53 PM   #2
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I don't actually think it has anything to do with the "macro" part of the lens of the description.

It's more than likely a simple function of the fact that that the Olympus macros happen to coincide with the ideal focal length for portraiture. The fact that those focal lengths happen to be found on the macro lenses is largely coincidence.

In 35mm photography, the preferred focal length for portraits is in the short to medium telephoto range: 70mm to 100mm. That is preferred because it gives the most natural perspective with minimal distortion and allows you to photgraph the subject without getting right into his or her face.

By coincidence, the Olympus macros happen to correspond perfectly to that range.

So, when you see a portrait taken with a 50mm macro, the photographer probably chose it because it is sharp lens with an ideal focal length for the job. Being a macro lens would have not been a factor...just a coincidence.

In fact, I use my 50mm macro for portraits all the time because I can get nice close shots from several feet away. That can be done with many of the zooms but you're more likely to find yourself working at one of the "extremes" which is fine...but if you have a sharp, fast, fixed lens then you may as well use it.
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Old Oct 6, 2006, 6:38 PM   #3
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If I had a 50 f2 Zuiko I'd use it for portraits anytime I needed to shoot one. It's f2, so good shallow depth of field, it's the equivalent of 100mm in 35mm terms, perfect focal length, AND it's much lighter than my 50-200 Zuiko, so easier to hold one-handed vertically with my E-1, with or without the accessory battery holder fitted.

Macro lenses are designed for close focusing, but they focus to infinity too, so they are good, all 'round lenses. Don't think of them beingjust for close-ups.
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Old Oct 6, 2006, 6:48 PM   #4
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Hi Brent, Greg

Thanks for clearing that one up as I was a little confused about why you'd use a macro lens such as the 50mm f2 for non macro shots.

Cheers

HarjTT

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