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Old Oct 7, 2006, 3:40 PM   #1
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When I set the shuter speed to 1/4000 and the ISO to auto and go outside no matter where I set theaperture valueI get a black picture. I still know very little about photo settings but I'm tring to figure it out. 1/4000 is for stopping very fast motion without blurring, correct? So why can't I get this to work?
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Old Oct 7, 2006, 3:56 PM   #2
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What mode are you trying to shoot in...if you are shooting in Manual, YOU have to manually balance the aperture to the set shutter speed.

If you are shooting in Shutter Priority, you select 1/4000 and your aperture will be flashing, it's letting you know that you have gone beyond the aperture required for the amount of light there is.

Exposure is a balance between shutter speed and lens opening (aperture). If you increase one you have to increase the other.
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Old Oct 7, 2006, 9:53 PM   #3
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I was shooting in Shutter priority, but it wouldn't let me adjust the AP enough to shoot in 1/4000. I tried all the way open and closed as much as it would let me. So what do you do?
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Old Oct 7, 2006, 10:21 PM   #4
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1/4000 ?? What are you trying to stop motion to? A speeding bullet?



Try lower that a little bit, most object can be stopped in the 1/250 to 1/500 range.. Or at least the birds, sports, and nascar photos I have taken that has worked for..



The reasoning why the aperture wouldnt adjust enough for ya, is because it couldnt let enough light in to make that shutter speed work successfully. Most likely, you were shooting under a poor light condition or shooting with a slow camera lens.


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Old Oct 8, 2006, 9:31 AM   #5
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I've seen pictures of dragsters doing burnouts and you could read the words "Goodyear" on the tires. I was tring to take pictures of cars going past my house with mine. I didn't relise the lens made a differance. I have a Sigma 18-50mm 1:3.5-5.6
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Old Oct 8, 2006, 12:47 PM   #6
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Metalhead wrote:
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I've seen pictures of dragsters doing burnouts and you could read the words "Goodyear" on the tires. I was tring to take pictures of cars going past my house with mine. I didn't relise the lens made a differance. I have a Sigma 18-50mm 1:3.5-5.6
It makes a HUGE difference.

What time of the day were you doing this? That also has an effect.

Correct exposure consists of getting two variables right, the shutter speed and aperture, or f-stop. You are setting a short shutter speed of 1/4000 sec and the camera cannot select a correct f-stop due to some variable in the images you are shooting. At 1/4000 sec, you are going to need a LOT of light to get a correct f-stop. If the image is dark or at nightthat means there's not enough light at 1/4000 second, so your frame is dark. A complete, exhaustiveexplanationwould get a little wordy here. Look up something onGoogle regarding exposure, like this:

http://www.photoxels.com/tutorial_exposure.html

The subject of exposure and gettingeverything "right" is not something you'll learn quickly if you are just getting started, and some of your comments lead me to believe you are fairly new at it. Do some research regarding exposure such as the above link, and maybe even find out names of photographers who do work like you want to do, and see if they have any quick and dirty technical lessons about what they do.

Learning correct exposure technique is an ongoing thing. I spent many years and wasted a lot of money on film and processing learning the hard way. Digital, once you have the equipment, makes it much easier and with less as-you-go expense. Good luck.


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Old Oct 8, 2006, 3:44 PM   #7
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Just to let you know it was broad daylight on an overcast day.
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Old Oct 8, 2006, 4:28 PM   #8
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Metalhead wrote:
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Just to let you know it was broad daylight on an overcast day.

Still not enough info for anyone to be able to tell youyour exactproblem. Here are just a fewissues related to the way you tried to do what you were doing.

Auto ISO- Never a good option. Your camera has an ISO range of 100-1600, or 3200 if you had an E-1 and selected the "right" ISO manually. Auto ISO only will pick within the range ofISO 100-400. It never goes beyond that range in "Auto"so you've really limited yourself in using auto ISO.

Broad daylight and overcast are two different types of light. Let's assume your camera selected an ISOsetting of 400. If this was an overcast day, a typical exposure is 1/500 sec at f5.6. Based on that sameexposure, you get the same results at 1/1000 sec at f 4, 1/2000 sec at f 2.8 and 1/4000 sec at f2, so you would have needed f2 at 1/4000 second to get a "good" exposure. The MAXIMUM speed of your lens is f3.5 at the 18mm end and f5.6 at 50mm, so you are, at best,3 stops too slow at 50mm to record an image at 1/4000, so I am not surprised you got nothing but dark or blankimages. If your camera selected ISO 100 or 200 instead, your images would be even more underexposed, and I'm betting that's what happened to you, but you might never know. Can you tell what ISO the camera used? With manymodels you are not given that information when you let the camera make the decision.

These are just two examples. If the sky had not been overcast, a typical exposure in bright sunshineat ISO 400is 1/500 sec at f11. Using the same progression as above, theother f-stop/ shutter speed combinations would be:

1/1000 sec at f8

1/2000 sec at f5.6

1/4000 sec at f4

You see, with direct sunlight you don't need as much sunlight, but your lens at 50mm,f5.6 is still too slow, and these examples are IF your camera picked ISO 400. If it picked ISO 100 or 200, your lens would have been even more useless due to the lack of a fast enough f-stop.

There are a lot of variables with exposure- more than you are taking into consideration. You can't just pick a fast shutter speed because you need to. If your lens is not fast enough orif you don't pick a fast enough ISO or if you don't have enough light you won't get the results you want.

Two fixes based on what you'vegiven uswould be foryou to eithermanually adjust your ISO to 800 or 1600 and/or get yourself a faster lens. Even using those faster ISO settings you may need the faster lens to utilize the1/4000 setting. The 18-50 f3.5-5.6 is good enough for basic needs, but is woefully lacking for many others, including what you are trying to do.

You could also use a lower shutter speed. 1/1000 is pretty darn fast. I bet if I went through the thousands of RAW files I have captured with my E-1 and E-300 I would not find one time I used above 1/1000 second.




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Old Oct 8, 2006, 7:12 PM   #9
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Thanks for the great info. It will give me sonething to work with.
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Old Oct 8, 2006, 7:55 PM   #10
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I'm not seeing which camera you have in the previous messages, so I'll just pick one out, the E-500. I went to the Olympus page and downloaded the manual and looked at page 43, which isdedicated to Shutter Priority shooting. I know the E-1 and E-300 do it, but I just wanted to verify with the E-500, if you see the aperture value in the viewfinderblinking while in Shutter Speed Priority mode, that is a visual warning where the camera is telling you the aperture selected will not yield a good exposure. If yousee that, either choose a faster ISO or lower your shutter speed until that f-stop number in the viewfinder does not blink. I think most cameras from all makers do this in Shutter Priority mode.
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