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Old Dec 26, 2006, 11:35 PM   #1
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I'm using an E-500 that I bought this summer. I'm not exactly happy with the 14-45mm f3.5-5.6 kit lens. What about the 50mm f2.0 macro or 14-50mm f2.8-3.5? What about the new Sigma 18-50mm f2.8? I take pics of flowers and bugs mostly. However, I had to trot out the Sony 717 when I took pictures of our church renovation because it has an f2.0 lens. Are the Zuiko lenses as good as Zeiss?
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Old Dec 26, 2006, 11:45 PM   #2
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Hello....

I also recently bought a used E-500 with the dual-kit lenses package, off an eBay seller.

I'm not happy with the results so far, with the pics it provides. I had been reading a lot of the other forums, along with this forum, about other E-500 kit lenses user's results.

It has been varying. Some are saying and have pics that show they are getting "reasonably" exceptable results. Yet, others state the lenses lack the "sharpest" we all like to see in our photos.

Is the anyone here with the E-500/kit lenses package with photos online, I could look at please?

Thanks...Have a great Blessed Happy New Year 2007 soon...


Blessings,
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Old Dec 27, 2006, 6:10 AM   #3
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The pre-E-400 kit lenses were the best among camera brands, but the 14-45mm does tend to be soft. The 14-54mm from the E-1 is superior.

As for seeing images taken with the 14-45mm (and 14-54mm), check out:

http://www.pbase.com/cameras/olympus (you'll have to wait for the ENTIRE page to load, and scroll to the bottom).

Some direct links (remember these can be taken by photographers of ANY skill level):
http://www.pbase.com/cameras/olympus...-56_digital_ed
http://www.pbase.com/cameras/olympus/zuiko_14-54_28-35

http://www.pbase.com/cameras/olympus..._35-45_digital
http://www.pbase.com/cameras/olympus...-35_digital_ed
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Old Dec 27, 2006, 8:26 AM   #4
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I am very happy with my two kit lenses, in fact so happy that I bought an e-500 with two kit lenses as backup.

The 14-54mm zoom and the two Olympus macro lenses are undoubtedly sharper, but I wonder if you really need that kind of sharpness.

How about showing us examples of something you are not happy with, taken using a tripod to ensure your problems are not caused by camera shake.

Jorgen
http://jorgen.photoblog.com/

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Old Dec 29, 2006, 10:25 AM   #5
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Tripod pictures arn't the problem. I was three stories up, on a scaffold, inside our cathedral, with my knees knocking together. Yes, I got the pictures that I needed, but the Sony 717 did a better job. I think I simply need an f2 or f2.8. I would still like to hear from anyone with the new Sigma 18-50 f2.8.:-)
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Old Dec 29, 2006, 12:05 PM   #6
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lil ole me wrote:
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Tripod pictures arn't the problem. I was three stories up, on a scaffold, inside our cathedral, with my knees knocking together. Yes, I got the pictures that I needed, but the Sony 717 did a better job. I think I simply need an f2 or f2.8. I would still like to hear from anyone with the new Sigma 18-50 f2.8.:-)
You should also note that 1) a P&S camera with tiny sensor has innately more depth of field than any dSLR with larger sensor; and 2) dSLRs are routinely set with lower sharpness than P&S cameras since it's assumed that users of SLRs are going to be using post-processing programs like Photoshop provided with USM functions. My recommendation would be to try adding some sharpening either in-camera (if shooting JPEGs) or (even better) afterwards using Photoshop or Paintshop Pro, etc., particularly if shooting RAW. Going from a P&S (fixed lens) camera with small sensor to a dSLR with larger sensor involves a learning curve, but it's worth the effort.


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Old Dec 30, 2006, 11:24 AM   #7
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Thanks, I'll keep that in mind.
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Old Dec 31, 2006, 9:34 AM   #8
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