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Old Apr 10, 2007, 9:44 PM   #1
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I'm new to the macro world but am eager to improve.

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F/4

1/200

ISO 100
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Old Apr 10, 2007, 9:51 PM   #2
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#2



F/5

1/250

ISO 200



I had a lot of trouble with the dragonflies because of wind and movement with only a 35mm. DoF was also a challenge but I guess that's the central crux of macro. I also wish this shot was a lot sharper.
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Old Apr 11, 2007, 12:30 PM   #3
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i have listed a question re the very set up you have, my question is at 35mm how close to the subject do you have to be, as a fella in the local camera shop claims between 4-6 inches, if that is the case, i would probably keep my current camera as there would not be a great deal of focusing distance to justify the out lay, can i ask how close you were to the drogonfly please, and how do you rateyour setup yourself, as in photographic terms i will be behind you and what you have achived my current camera is a canons3is

thanks, alan
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Old Apr 12, 2007, 6:26 AM   #4
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You can't get it all sharp and that is not necessary either. The important thing is in photography of all living beings to get the eyes sharp - unless of course your photo is illustrating the structure of for example the wings.

I love the selective focusing of the flower. Very nice!

I have some macros in my macro category in my blog.

Jorgen
http://jorgen.photoblog.com/

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Old Apr 12, 2007, 6:32 AM   #5
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jad123 wrote:
Quote:
i have listed a question re the very set up you have, my question is at 35mm how close to the subject do you have to be, as a fella in the local camera shop claims between 4-6 inches, if that is the case, i would probably keep my current camera as there would not be a great deal of focusing distance to justify the out lay, can i ask how close you were to the drogonfly please, and how do you rateyour setup yourself, as in photographic terms i will be behind you and what you have achived my current camera is a canons3is

thanks, alan
You can find the manual for the 35mm here
http://www.olympus.co.jp/en/support/...an_35macro.pdf

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Old Apr 12, 2007, 9:27 AM   #6
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Quote:
You can't get it all sharp and that is not necessary either. The important thing is in photography of all living beings to get the eyes sharp - unless of course your photo is illustrating the structure of for example the wings.

Yea, the focus is not great with the dragonfly. They were very mobile and with a 35 mm macro lens, it's very tough to get close enough. That's why I'm wondering if one of the longer macro lenses would help.


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I love the selective focusing of the flower. Very nice!
Thanks
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Old Apr 12, 2007, 10:55 AM   #7
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A longer focal length will give less magnification, and that is what to take a maidenfly. Work on your technique instead and get close.

My avatar is a maidenfly taken even closer using an e-300 with the 35mm macro. In my blog you will see other insects also taken at around 1:1.

Jorgen

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Old Apr 12, 2007, 2:54 PM   #8
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The Sigma 105 f2.8 will do 1:1 with a close focus distance of 31 cm:
http://www.sigma-photo.co.jp/english...cro/105_28.htm

The Zuiko 50 f2 will do .5x magnification with a close focus of 21 cm; you can get to 1:1 by using the extension tube:
http://www.olympus-esystem.com/dea/products/lens/ex-25/

Keep in mind that distances are from the image plane, so the 14.7 cm distance for the 35mm lens, after you subtract 5.3 cm for the lens, ends up being less than 9.4 cm, or 3.7 inches from the lens front. Altogether, it will likely be around 3 inches. For the 50mm f2.0, I believe the closest focus point would be about 6 inches from the front of the lens, and for the 100mm, around 8 inches.

But, keep in mind also that 1:1 means you are filling the sensor with an object of the same size. The sensor is about 13mm high, or 1.3 cm, so just over half an inch. So if you are shooting something two inches high, you might only need .25x magnification, and could shoot from a bit farter away. Also, some of the kit lenses will close focus, but not to 1:1. But for things larger than an inch, they might sometimes do.

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Old Apr 12, 2007, 5:14 PM   #9
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Forgive my ignorance, but, as I understand it, using a 105mm macro lens would allow me to have a greater distance from the subject but get an equilvalent type of shot in terms of size of the subject.

I'm highly encouraged by the shots Jorgen seems to get from the 35 mm but the additional focal length would make the job easier no? Being able to stay back that extra foot can make a difference for the more skittish subjects.

Also, the 35 mm ZD is a fairly slow lensand I've found it tough to get steady shots with wind, moving subjects and my own hand.



I'm enjoying the thread and comments. Looking forward to some good weather so I can go out and enjoy my camera again.
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Old Apr 12, 2007, 6:57 PM   #10
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I have the 50mm macro lens, but don't like to use it as such due to the small working distance (3 or 4 inches) at closest focus.

For large insects such as dragonflys I have found that a longer telephoto lens with an extension tubegive a much better working distance, its not capable of true macros just close-ups, but it does fairly well.

My favorite to use is the 50-200mm with EX25, gives a working distance of about 3 feet, very nicefor skiddish bugs. I used this combo for this pic.




To look more like a macroI use a crop








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