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Old Jun 22, 2007, 1:07 AM   #1
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Simple question:

Are the screw holes in tripods all universally the same size or do they vary from brand to brand?

If they do vary, anyone know the size to get for the E-500?

Thanks in advance. I was thinking of ordering one off of Ebay, but am clueless. Any recommended brands for a good price would be appreciated as well.
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Old Jun 22, 2007, 11:38 AM   #2
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Nope, they're standard. The only difference is if you buy an expensive tripod without the head...the screw to attach the head is a larger diameter, so you'd also need to buy the head extra which comes with the standard sized screw for attaching the camera (those who buy the expensive tripods want to choose their own tripod head).
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Old Jun 22, 2007, 2:10 PM   #3
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Hey, thanks.

Appreciate it.
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Old Jun 22, 2007, 3:07 PM   #4
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KeithA39 wrote:
Quote:
Any recommended brands for a good price would be appreciated as well.
Hi, Keith

Philosophically, tripodsfit into two categories: lighter-weight for still cameras, and heavy-duty ones for video cameras. Thevideo-camera sticks(if you want to converse with video-camera pros, they use the term "sticks" for tripods) are beefy, have a fluid-head to allow smooth panning, and are expensive. Still-camera tripods are lighter, less expensive, and both types are rated for the weight they will support.

If you take a look at the tripods sold by B&H photo, there are a number of brand names. The Bogen/Manfredo sticks are generally regarded as the best but they're expensive because they are durable enough to withstand the abuse a pro requires.

Personally I have been happy with a pair of Slik units. The tripod I have is a Slik "Pro 700 DX". It's a solid unit but kinda heavy - there may be other sticks that can support the same weight and weigh less but "less weight" = "lighter material construction with the same strength" = "carbon fiber probably" = "way more cost" (just like automobiles).

The other Slik unit I have is a monopod, which I tend to use more than a tripod. A monopod can steady a photo while being a lot more portable - you should consider one unless you're in a situation where your camera can remain in one spot for a long time and you just don't need to move it.

Hope this helps.

Ted
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Old Jun 22, 2007, 5:16 PM   #5
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The problem with many cheap tripods is that either the leg locks or the geared center columns were out quickly making them wobbley.

Me I'm old school. The tripod I use the most is a tilt-all. These are big, heavy and take a little longer to set up. The design hasn't changed sense they were introduced in the 30's. But I don't see that it could be improved. This is not a tripod you would want to take back packing. But it is sturdy and reliable (I've had mine for twenty years and it's like new). What I like about it is that fully extended its about seven feet tall. And they go for about $100 new. Its not as fancy as some of the Gitzo or Bogen tripods but it cost less usually. This is probably the most common tripod owned by pro's sense the 30's so you should be able to find one used in good shape. This might seem like over kill for today's digital cameras. But you should remember that with modern lighter cameras the need for a steady support is even more important.
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Old Jun 22, 2007, 7:05 PM   #6
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Thanks for the responses.

Yeah, I saw quite a few Bogens in my searches and they seem to be rated highly. I still have my old Tristar from my old non-digital Canon AE1 days, but pulled it out of the closet only to find that the plastic clamps had snapped on two of the legs. Told my wife that I'd give it the old go at fixing it, but she thought a new one was the way to go. Thinking of getting a monopod for hiking situations and a tripod for things like night shooting...once I get my skill levels up to snuff again. So, a heavier, but sturdier one, might be the way to go, saving the monopod for those long walks where I don't want to lug a load.
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Old Jun 23, 2007, 2:37 PM   #7
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You can find more material in the Tripod section of this site: http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...orum.php?id=73

Jorgen
http://jorgen.photoblog.com/

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Old Jun 23, 2007, 3:45 PM   #8
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Thanks, Jorgen.

Just noticed that last night. Been perusing their threads.
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