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Old Sep 8, 2007, 5:50 PM   #1
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Does anyone have any idea if they make something to keep your camera dry. I just left my sons football game and I couldn't get any pics because it rained the whole time. I didn't know if there was a special kinda thing to put around your camera and just have the end of the lens stick out or anything.
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Old Sep 8, 2007, 7:09 PM   #2
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You could buy the E-1 along with its weatherproof lenses.

Some people have used those freezer bags cutting a hole to stick the front element through.

There's also rainshields designed for cameras like this one from Kata:
http://www.kata-bags.com/Item.asp?pi...amp;ProdLine=4

Check with larger camera stores, or if you don't have one locally there's always B&H.
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Old Sep 9, 2007, 3:38 AM   #3
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Putting it in a plastic bag can lead to condensation, which can be worse than just letting a few raindrops land on the camera, additionally once a drop of water gets in the bag (which it will) it tends not to come out as easily.

As Mikefellh says, the more expensive Oly lenses are weatherproof. The 14-54 is the 'standard' one in this range, and the 50-200 would be good for sports. Keepinga non-rainproof body tucked into an open coat front, with a rainproof lens sticking out is a reasonable proposition while waiting for the action, and the odd drop of rain landing on the camera when it comes up to the eye is unlikely to get all the way in to damage it (no guarantees though).

With the summer we've had in the UK using my E510 in the rain has been the only way to take a picture with it sometimes. A flannel face cloth in the camera bag quickly dries the main water off during shooting, and I limit my fiddling with buttons and dials, but it is surprising how little water doesland on the body compared to the lens, baring a complete downpour. I'm willing to take the risk, so I'm not recommending the practice, and I know electronics can be delicate, but years of sensibly using non-sealed film and digital cameras in bad weather I've never had a problem. Save for the odd Leica M body and lens that has needed to be put on a radiator to dry out, but they truly are built to take abuse.
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Old Sep 9, 2007, 11:39 AM   #4
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Quote:
As Mikefellh says, the more expensive Oly lenses are weatherproof. The 14-54 is the 'standard' one in this range, and the 50-200 would be good for sports.
Yes, but only if used on a weatherproof body, i.e. e-1 or the new professional e-camera coming later this year. Using them on the other e-cameras doesn't make a weatherproof system.

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Old Sep 10, 2007, 3:27 AM   #5
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The lens remains weatherproof unless water gets into the camera body and finds its way all the way through the bodyandinto the back of the lens. I think under those circumstances it could be assumed the non weatherproofcamera body had been out in the monsoon or dropped into a large puddle and left there a while.

I said nothing at all that even alluded in the faintest possible wayto the 'system' becoming weatherproof just by putting a weatherproof lens on a non weatherproof body. Indeed I made frequent comments on how to stop water damaging a non weatherproof body. I'm not sure how much of my post you didn't read, but it must have been nearly all of it :roll:
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Old Sep 11, 2007, 10:18 PM   #6
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Thanks everyone for the info.
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Old Sep 12, 2007, 9:23 AM   #7
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I'll second the recommendation for the Kata system. I use it and it's a great compromise. Aquatech makes the best rain covers but they're very pricey. The Kata system is very well constructed - certainly better than using a plastic bag. You have access to all the camera controlls via sleeves as well as a velcro or zipperopening for a monopod if you use one.

Even with weather sealed equipment pro shooters still use rain gear. Why spend thousands of $$$ on gear and balk at spending $60 on a rain cover to guarantee protection?
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