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Old Mar 24, 2008, 2:47 PM   #11
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Thanks for the information. I have been suspecting this camera is best at outdoor work since I got it, but I think you and the other folks here are confirming that. This was my first real step to digital from my Minolta 35mm. I never realised how good that camera was until I tried replacing it with digital!
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Old Mar 24, 2008, 2:49 PM   #12
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That lines already at the top of my list - but for macro work and portraiture. I didn't know it would be versatile enough for sports shooting, too. It may just make this week's paycheck rather than waiting for next month :-) Thanks!
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Old Mar 24, 2008, 2:56 PM   #13
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You are so very correct - I forgot about that minor point :-) I am shooting semi-pro ball up here in Holland, Michigan - The Blast.
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Old Mar 24, 2008, 2:59 PM   #14
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PLTommyO wrote:
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You are so very correct - I forgot about that minor point :-) I am shooting semi-pro ball up here in Holland, Michigan - The Blast.
Then I would suggest figuring out what the correct exposure is before buying a lens. If conditions are bright enough there may be no need for a 2.0 lens.

I would further suggest, target shutter speed be 1/500 for that level.
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Old Mar 24, 2008, 3:06 PM   #15
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Definitely good advise from all, and especially about Greg C, and also about using the E-510.

You didn't mention your budget limitations, so for what it's worth: if you don't want to invest the big bucks now, you can get a legacy OM Zuiko 50mm F1.8 on e-bay for a very, very, reasonable price. It will give you the equivalent of 100mm on the 4/3 system. Also you canoften find the legacy OM Zuiko 75-150 F1.4. With the recent software update, the built-in image stabilizationon the E510 will now work with the legacy lens and the 4/3 adapter.

Good luck,

Steven R.
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Old Mar 24, 2008, 3:28 PM   #16
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Steven R wrote:
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Also you canoften find the legacy OM Zuiko 75-150 F1.4.
I think you mean Zuiko 75-150mm f/4. ;-) f/1.4 is 8 times as bright as f/4, and the only Zuiko 75-150mm lenses I see around are f/4 versus f/1.4.

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Old Mar 24, 2008, 5:28 PM   #17
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PLTommyO wrote:
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This was my first real step to digital from my Minolta 35mm.
Is it Autofocus (i.e., a Minolta Maxxum, Dynax or Alpha model)?

If so, you can use the same lenses you have for your Minolta 35mm camera on any Sony DSLR model (including the new Sony DSLR-A200, A300, A350 and A700).

These new Sony models all have very fast Autofocus systems, with ISO speeds up to ISO 3200 available (allowing shutter speeds twice as fast as most entry level DSLR models). As for AF speed, Dave Etchells over at imaging-resource.com got a full Autofocus Lag of 0.189 seconds for the Sony DSLR-A200. The Olympus E-510 tested at 0.35 seconds. That means the Sony is roughly twice as fast in the light Dave tested in. Here are how some of the under $1000 models compare in this area now:

Full Autofocus Lag:
Sony A200 0.189 second
Canon XTi 0.20 second
Nikon D40x 0.243 second
Pentax K10D 0.254 second
Olympus E-510 0.35 second

If you already have a Minolta 50mm f/1.4, 50mm f/1.7, 85mm f/1.4, 100m f/2 or similar lens, you can get a Sony DSLR-A200 body with an 18-70mm f/3.5-5.6 Autofocus lens for $599 now, with ISO speeds up to ISO 3200 available that would work with any Minolta Autofocus Lens ever made.

So, you may want to take that into consideration if you plan on shooting a lot of sports in lower light. It could be easier just to replace the body versus trying to find a lens that works well for basketball in lower light if you already have some Minolta AF lenses.

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Old Mar 24, 2008, 5:51 PM   #18
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The Minolta is a manual focus setup - I don't miss fiddling with focus on top of everything else!
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Old Mar 24, 2008, 5:54 PM   #19
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In that case, you may want to try an adapter with them on your existing E-500 and see if you can put up with the quirks associated with manual focus using a smaller viewfinder.

What lenses do you have? If they're better lenses, you may want to give them a shot before spending a lot of money on other solutions, depending on how often you plan on shooting low light sports.

There are a number of lens adapters available for the Olympus 4/3 system, including adapters that allow you to use your Minolta manual focus lenses (just look for an MC/MD to 4/3 adapter).

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Old Mar 24, 2008, 6:13 PM   #20
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It never occurred to me that here would even be an adapter. Thanks for the tip!
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