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Old Jun 8, 2008, 1:40 AM   #1
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This evening I went to a hill that sits above a large area of land just notheast(10-15 miles I'd guess) of downtown Dallas and set up to shoot the sunset. No clouds to create a lot of interesting sky detail, but you can get close enough at 300mm with the 70-300 that you don't need much to get some interesting shots!

This was shot at 215mm of the skyline as the sun to the west was reflecting off some of the buildings..



An overview of the area I was shooting at. This was recorded at 104mm..



Zooming into 300mm, you can make out a little bit of thedetail of some of the structures, a bird or two, and even a jet, probably landing at Love Field..



...just starting to touch the horizon, and another plane that appears to be flying into the abyss..



Last shot at the sun sinks into the west..






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Old Jun 8, 2008, 5:29 PM   #2
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Hi Greg

Really liked this series, the pics shooting into the sun look just spot on. No flaring or anything else with the 70-300 and I really like the detail in each frame.

Cheers

HarjTT

:O :?
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Old Jun 8, 2008, 6:39 PM   #3
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Very well shot shoots as HarjTT has commented on, no flare. shows how good these lenses are for entry level glass.


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Old Jun 11, 2008, 12:35 AM   #4
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great great shot!

Now this is where this rookie has problems....I can't seem to get my exposure compensation to the point there were its not too dark. Here is an example of what I am talking about.





Your sun came out perfect...advise?
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Old Jun 11, 2008, 8:19 AM   #5
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That would be a tough shot to get "right". Expose for the sky and you're going to have no detail in the architecture. Expose for the foreground and you are stuck with a blown sky. About the only option you have, if you want to include detail in both, would be to use a tripod so you couldtake about 4-6pictures that look exactly the same, butvarying the exposures enough to cover both extremes and then combine them in a program like Photoshop.
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Old Jun 11, 2008, 6:32 PM   #6
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Behind what Greg is saying, is that cameras are set up to "properly" expose to a "normally-lit" scene, for "normal" photos taken by "normal" people. So if you have an unusual lighting situation you need to bracket your exposures to over-ride the camera's assumptions because it will try to average the exposure over everything it sees, to get a "correct" exposure.

For example if you have a back-lit scene (like you're asking about) the camera will try to darken the backlighting and lighten the foreground so that the foreground gets closer to beingexposed properly. Ifyou really want the backlighting (like the setting sun) to be properly exposed and the foreground to be dark, you need to tell the camera to expose darker than it is naturally inclinedto. Because getting the correct exposure adjustment is difficult unless you do that type of exposure a lot and gain intuition about where to set the camera's exposure compensation, Greg is saying that at least at first, it's easier to justbracket the exposures. After some experience you get some intuition about the exposure compensation, but even experienced photographers bracket exposures in unusual lighting situations because, well, you never know for sure exactly what will turn out well.

I say this with apologies for putting words in Greg's mouth, especially that many. (sorry, Greg (grin).

And (I'm on a roll here) you should know something that most amateur photographers don't know, which is that the whole exposure system of a camera is designed around a set of opinions about what a "good" exposure is, on the part of the engineers working for the camera manufacturer. You may agree with them or you may not. In the film days, Kodak rated the ISO of Kodachrome film at values that mostphotographers disagreed with, so they just set the ISO setting in their film cameras to a value that gave them exposures they liked.

All that said,I have to say that the Oly E3 is the best camera I have ever used forproducing correct exposures for normally-lit situations. I suppose that means I agree with Oly's engineers...

Ted

PS:The technical reason behind everyting I said above about camera exposures being a matter of opinion, is basically that there isn't an agreed-upon quantitative definition about how the manufacturer should define whatthe camera's ISO settings should be, for any specific sensor. And this is despite the fact that "ISO" means the "International Organization for Standardization" which you might think would have established quantitative standards for establishing a sensor's ISO ratings.

And I apologize to Zig for needing a lot of coffee to read the above (grin)...
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Old Jun 11, 2008, 7:50 PM   #7
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Thanks for the input. I am going back to that place in a few hours to try again. I'll let you all know how it turns out. Sorry to pork up your thread there Greg.

SS
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Old Jun 11, 2008, 10:09 PM   #8
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signalsoldier wrote:
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Thanks for the input. I am going back to that place in a few hours to try again. I'll let you all know how it turns out. Sorry to pork up your thread there Greg.

SS
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Old Jul 4, 2008, 10:14 PM   #9
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I guess I am learning somethings from you guys :P


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Old Jul 5, 2008, 10:41 AM   #10
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Nice series Greg, I like the continuity along with the clean looking photos.

But, ya know what...you guys and your freekin' 70-300's are begining to get to me......:-)



Nice shot SS, big difference between lighting the view and back lighting, (silhouetting) isn't there. Sometime the backlighting is desirable though.
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