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Old Jun 14, 2008, 10:06 AM   #1
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This isn't just an Oly thing but I'd been looking at examples of "light painting" and feeling like it might be a fun project.

Then...I saw the cover of the last National Geographic and the amazing photo of Stonehenge. At first I didn't realize it was a light painting but inside the back cover he tells how he did it.

Middle ofa darknight, a 15 minute exposure and a flashlight/Torch. He dressed in black and walked around literally painting the stones with the flashlight. Wonderful result.

Now my E500 will only give me a 60 second shutter time (I think) but that would work on a smaller scale.

Anyone ever tried it and with what results? Huh, Huh, Huh..! :-)
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Old Jun 14, 2008, 10:14 AM   #2
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Hi Ken,

Never heard of it although it does sound interesting. I guess, the only way to know is to try it. Hope you post some of your results.

:|

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Old Jun 14, 2008, 11:15 AM   #3
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your E500 has a bulb setting, you would use this setting
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Old Jun 14, 2008, 11:16 AM   #4
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Actually, if you use BULB in manual mode you can get upto eight minutes.

Unfortunately with the E-500 and E-330 you can use a cable remote with them to lock the shutter, you have to either have someone holding down the camera (risking camera shake), or use W&T on the RM-1 to open and close the shutter (but making sure that no IR light gets into the lens or else you'd see the light in your picture).

Unfortunately Olympus didn't see the need for putting a cable remote connector on the E-330 or E-500 (the E-300 needed the HLD-3 to use the cable)...at least the smartened up with the newer cameras via extra pins on the USB connector (no, it doesn't work for the E-500 or E-330 because it is extra pins, not standard USB).

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Old Jun 14, 2008, 11:24 AM   #5
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Hi, Scouse

Digicams are often used for long exposures for astrophotography. I mention this because one thing to know is that it takes power to keep the shutter open, which runs down the battery. So you need to be sure you use a fully-charged battery. And if you live in a cold climate (not like the Strait of Juan de Fuca) this gets a lot worse in winter, when the battery isn't producing full power to begin with.

Ted
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Old Jun 14, 2008, 3:56 PM   #6
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examples






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Old Jun 14, 2008, 4:02 PM   #7
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This guy does superb work!

http://www.michaelfrye.com/port/night/night1.html
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Old Jun 14, 2008, 5:30 PM   #8
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Thanks for the responceguysand the examples, that lastlinkis outstanding, although as a personal taste I'm not sure about the colour.

I probably sound dumb (and you should see me :-)) But I didn't know there is a 'B' setting on the 500. I'm away from my camera right now. I thought that 60 secs was the longest. I guess they didn't change everything. One of the things I miss is the lack of remote cable and I'm glad they realised they can't get rid of it yet. A fully chargedbattery makes good sense.

I took someslides of Stonehenge with the OM2 many years ago, at night with long exposures. The lights from the occasional cars passing made for really ghostly images. When I finally get around to having them all put on disc, I'll see if I can find them.:roll:

Thanks again. Ken

This is more what I was thinking of:


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Old Jun 14, 2008, 6:44 PM   #9
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When I hear the term "painting with light" I think more of manually lighting up a scene with flashlights or flashes, or using lights to manually create a scene:




Some examples where I purposely moved the camera while the shutter was open while pointing at a fair ride:




A single laser pointing at the lens (don't look through viewfinder when trying this):


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Old Jun 15, 2008, 5:45 PM   #10
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I don't have an example here.... But usually when taking long open shutter shots, I get a lot of random flecks of noise in the pictures. Like it'll be a random red pixle in a dark blue sky, or someting like that. Easily touched up, but is that normal? E-510 btw.

Reason I thought about that now is because I've tried this somewhat, and noticed that in the results.
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