Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Olympus dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jul 10, 2008, 11:10 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
zig-123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Posts: 5,156
Default

Got up today and decided that I was going to go fishing. also brought the camera along just in case I saw something of interest. I never did really find any fish today but did find a group of terns, busy flying around searching for food. In this case, sand eels. I decided to take out the E-510 and 70-300mm and see just how close I could get.

Today I really got a good idea of how important sunlight is when using a long focal length lens such as the 70-300m outdoors. Up until today, i had been shooting mostly in bright sunlight and clear skies. Today, the sun was indeed out but itgot quite hazy and at times almost seemed as if it were cloudy.

The following shots were all hand held- (ever try usinga tripod on a boat?). Because the light was so hazy, I really had to boost up the ISO to 400 and then I tried a few at 800. These were all at 400. The shots all had a fair amount of noise which got cleaned up in neat-image. I tried but nixed the use of continuous auto-focus, The birds were too fast and the lens, due to the lack of bright light, too slow.

Thank goodness for digital cameras. I must have taken around 125 shots today and got a hanfdful of decent shots...









zig
zig-123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jul 11, 2008, 12:19 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
boBBrennan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Arlington, Texas USA
Posts: 3,566
Default

..........and I gotta tell ya the handful you posted is terrific. I once got a decent photo of a turkey vulture floating around on hot air but never anything really flying that was as good as the ones you show here.

Good job I think, too bad no fish....it goes that way some days out doesn't it.
____
boBB
boBBrennan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 11, 2008, 12:40 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 6,521
Default

Of all the beautiful images we see posted by folks who shoot this type subject all the time, we probably would be suprised if we knew how many "misses" they captured and we never seefor each "keeper" they post. The simple matter is, it takes a lot of practice and, often, some amount of luck in getting some of these type shots...being in the right place at the right time, with the birds flying off in the right direction.

I never try this type subject because it can be so frustrating, but if I did and got these type shots, I'd be very pleased. Good stuff.
Greg Chappell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 11, 2008, 6:52 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
zig-123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Posts: 5,156
Default

Hi Bob/Greg,

Thanks for the kind words........as for the fishing, I long ago lost the need to catch a fish everytime out. These days, just being out on the water and enjoying the beauty of the world we live in are just fine with me.....probably why I don't catch a lot of fish.

Greg, having tried a few times now to shoot birds in flight I realize just how frustrating it is. But it's fun to try and with each time out, I'm trying different settings and having a great time learning what my camera can do.

I think the single point I've learned out of all of this is to forget the knocks on high ISO limitations of theOly cameras that we've all read about. If you hadn't posted your shots using your particular settings and higher ISO values, I don't think I would have ever gone above 200.

:|

Zig




zig-123 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 7:49 AM.