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Old Apr 8, 2009, 6:19 PM   #1
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Just upgraded from an Oly SP570UZ. While they are fairly similar in many aspects, the whole lens thing is somewhat confusing. I just snapped these off and ran 'em through Picasa quickly. I can see right now I'm going to need SUBSTANTIALLY more lens than this 40m-150mm kit lens! These were HEAVILY cropped. About 75%. Still not toooo bad for the first shots (considering I don't have a clue as to what the heck I'm doing!) :?









~~ Gary
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Old Apr 8, 2009, 9:02 PM   #2
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Hi Gary,

Congrats on upgrading to a DSLR camera. Hope you have lots of fun with it and postsome picsas you have here. You'll get a lot of information here and help if needed.

A couple of suggestions to shorten the learning curve:

Wrotniak.net is a website that is almost exclusively devoted to all things having to do with Olympus cameras. The site has a lot of information relative to specific cameras and the best settings to use for each. Additionally, there are a lot of technical articles that will help you better understand the differences between lenses, how to, etc.

The link is:http://www.wrotniak.net/photo/43/index.html

I'm not sure if you do this already but another way of learning quickly how to shoot specific situations, birds for example, visit a photo sharing site such as smugmug.com or PBase.com and run a search. When you see a photo that interests you, you can look at the EXIF data and it will tell you the settings, lens and camerathe photographer used in order to achieve the shot.

Last, Olympus USA has a tutorial section that explains in detail how to get the best results for a myiriad of different types of photography. It worthlooking at.

http://www.olympusamerica.com/cpg_se...arn_center.asp

Good luck and most of all have fun.



Zig




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Old Apr 8, 2009, 9:59 PM   #3
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Thanks very much for the info and the welcome! Much appreciated.
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Old Apr 9, 2009, 7:11 AM   #4
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It looks like your off and running!

The DSLR will have a couple differences. The first you've already found out. The lenses need to be bigger to compensate for a larger sensor. That E410/40-150 is as small as you can get for that kind of reach. Compared to a 35mm camera and a 300mm lens, your still in good shape.

The second is that the depth of field of larger sensors becomes narrower, especially noticable with long lenses. You can stop down the aperture to get more DOF if thats what you desire. With a narrower DOF, focus points are more critical. I tend to use the center point and pay close attention to place it on the subject (or part of the subject) I want in focus.

The most important thing I have to add is not to hesitate to press the shutter button. Take lots of pics, look to see what you like and how you got them, and ask questions here if you want to.

Greg
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Old Apr 9, 2009, 7:21 AM   #5
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fldspringer wrote:
Quote:
It looks like your off and running!

The DSLR will have a couple differences. The first you've already found out. The lenses need to be bigger to compensate for a larger sensor. That E410/40-150 is as small as you can get for that kind of reach. Compared to a 35mm camera and a 300mm lens, your still in good shape.

The second is that the depth of field of larger sensors becomes narrower, especially noticable with long lenses. You can stop down the aperture to get more DOF if thats what you desire. With a narrower DOF, focus points are more critical. I tend to use the center point and pay close attention to place it on the subject (or part of the subject) I want in focus.

The most important thing I have to add is not to hesitate to press the shutter button. Take lots of pics, look to see what you like and how you got them, and ask questions here if you want to.

Greg
Thanks very much, Greg! Most helpful.

I came across this item on eBay. I've purchased stuff from Cameta before with pretty good luck. However, this seems too good to be true. I need a little guidance from you guys.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=200319716104
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Old Apr 9, 2009, 8:12 AM   #6
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gjtoth wrote:
Quote:
I came across this item on eBay. I've purchased stuff from Cameta before with pretty good luck. However, this seems too good to be true. I need a little guidance from you guys.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=200319716104

The old adage of: "You get what you pay for" is probably never more true than when it comes to digital lenses with long focal lengths. The lens in question has at f8 isquite slow which is to be expected at that price point. Meaning that it's going to need a lot of light in order to get sharp images. Most all of the lenses that are similar to the one you're looking at produce, at best,soft images. If you're thinking about taking photos of static objects like the moon, it may be acceptable. for birding it most probably willget you frustrated.

An alternative would be to save your hard earned money and look at perhaps a used 50-200mm ED Olympus digital or the Olympus 70-300mm ZD digitallens. I have both and find for birding, the 50-200mm is outstanding.

The 50-200mm can be had for around 550 to 600 dollars. While the 70-300mm lens sells for 360 dollarsnew 275 to 280 used.

Here's a link to a gallery of photos using the 50-200mm. It is a good example of what can be done with a 50-200mm lens.

http://www.pbase.com/searun/bosque_del_apache_2007



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Old Apr 9, 2009, 8:41 AM   #7
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zig-123 wrote:
Quote:
gjtoth wrote:
Quote:
I came across this item on eBay. I've purchased stuff from Cameta before with pretty good luck. However, this seems too good to be true. I need a little guidance from you guys.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=200319716104

The old adage of: "You get what you pay for" is probably never more true than when it comes to digital lenses with long focal lengths. The lens in question has at f8 isquite slow which is to be expected at that price point. Meaning that it's going to need a lot of light in order to get sharp images. Most all of the lenses that are similar to the one you're looking at produce, at best,soft images. If you're thinking about taking photos of static objects like the moon, it may be acceptable. for birding it most probably willget you frustrated.

An alternative would be to save your hard earned money and look at perhaps a used 50-200mm ED Olympus digital or the Olympus 70-300mm ZD digitallens. I have both and find for birding, the 50-200mm is outstanding.

The 50-200mm can be had for around 550 to 600 dollars. While the 70-300mm lens sells for 360 dollarsnew 275 to 280 used.

Here's a link to a gallery of photos using the 50-200mm. It is a good example of what can be done with a 50-200mm lens.

http://www.pbase.com/searun/bosque_del_apache_2007


That's what I'm lookin' for! Excellent captures, Zig.

What about Sigma stuff? Anything there that might work comparably? How about a teleconverter (extender)?
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Old Apr 9, 2009, 9:11 AM   #8
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Looks like your camera focused on the tree behind the bird vs. the bird itself. Judging from the detail on the tree (even with cropping), the camera/lens combo looks pretty sharp! You can try to lock the focus and recompose, or if your camera cna adjust the focus point from center to left /right, it may help focus on the subject vs. the background. You might also do some tests to make sure that your camera/lens is not back focusing (i.e. you focus on a subject, but the actual point of focus is actually behind the subject). Some higher end DSLR's allow you to compensate for this condition. If all of this checks out OK, ss others have suggested, you can try a smaller aperture to get a larger depth of field.

BTW, too bad about the Lady Cards this week :sad:. I live about 1.5 hours up the road from you near Covington.
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Old Apr 9, 2009, 10:00 AM   #9
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jelpee wrote:
Quote:
Looks like your camera focused on the tree behind the bird vs. the bird itself. Judging from the detail on the tree (even with cropping), the camera/lens combo looks pretty sharp! You can try to lock the focus and recompose, or if your camera cna adjust the focus point from center to left /right, it may help focus on the subject vs. the background. You might also do some tests to make sure that your camera/lens is not back focusing (i.e. you focus on a subject, but the actual point of focus is actually behind the subject). Some higher end DSLR's allow you to compensate for this condition. If all of this checks out OK, ss others have suggested, you can try a smaller aperture to get a larger depth of field.

BTW, too bad about the Lady Cards this week :sad:. I live about 1.5 hours up the road from you near Covington.
I'm finding all this stuff out. These were the very first shots I've ever taken with a DSLR. I just got it yesterday. Here are a few I took today. See any improvement?











I'm afraid I don't follow sports. I know... I know... but, I'm not originally from Kentucky. Nice to know yer out there!
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Old Apr 9, 2009, 12:45 PM   #10
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I still notice that the area behind your main subject is more in focus compared to your subject. If you took these with the focus pointpointed at the subject, it may indicate a backfocusing issue. You can test it using the instructions at the following link http://focustestchart.com/focus21.pdf

You can try a different lens to see if the issue is with the lens or the body. In the interim, shootiing at a smaller aperture should give you enough depth of field to comensate for any back focusing issues.

Hope this helps.
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