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Old Nov 28, 2009, 7:10 PM   #21
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Default Another try

ISO 100, f4 tripod

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Old Nov 28, 2009, 10:40 PM   #22
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Default One last try.

Seeing conditions are great. Moon is almost directly overhead.

425mm f5.6 and ISO 200 with 1/400s shutter, 2s delay.


Last edited by fldspringer; Nov 28, 2009 at 10:50 PM.
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Old Nov 29, 2009, 9:13 AM   #23
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Default Good work guys

Great shots of the moon by both of you.

I'd love to join in but the weather has been anything but cooperative up here.
We've had 4 straight days of rain, wind and generally lousy weather.

Wouldn't make any difference though, I could not come close to your shots.


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Old Nov 29, 2009, 10:37 AM   #24
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As someone who has done astronomy and (some) astrophotography for many years, if you're interested I'll give you some advice, not about camera settings but about when to shoot the moon (no pun intended).

The moon is a sun-lit object and when you image it when its phase is larger than a half moon, you're doing the same thing as shooting terrestrial landscapes around noon. No shadows, lighting is flat, no detail. If you look at your shots the only contrast and detail you'll see is at what is called the terminator, which is the boundary between the lit and unlit parts of the moon. Astrophotographers who image the moon almost never try to do that when the phase is larger than a quarter moon. Try that and I think you'll be pleased with your results - way more of the image will have detail.

Ted
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Old Nov 30, 2009, 7:03 AM   #25
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Default Thanks Greg,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Chappell View Post
Here's one I did this evening, using my E620, 50-200 and EC20 at 400mm..

Used ISO 100 and (gasp) my tripod and Live View with the LCD flipped out for ease of viewing and framing, with IS off, 1/250 sec at f7.1.

Shot it as an in-camera JPEG using the Large, Superfine setting, then opened it up in Adobe Camera RAW...you can process JPEG's in Adobe Camera RAW... added clarity, made s light WB adjustment, increased contrast via the parametric curves and sharpened with masking on the areas with less detail, then cropped it to what you see here after blowing up to 100%.

The really cool part about using ACR with a JPEG is, the original file is always there untouched. Everything you do can be reversed or adjusted. Once converted back into Photoshop, you save the corrected image as a new file. If you ever want to go back later to the original, it opens back up in ACR with everything as you left it so it's easy to create an identical file 6 months later if you need to.
Thanks for posting your explanation on using Adobe's ACR program. I had forgotten about the program's capability of post processing Jpegs. I just installed the Elements 8.0 version of Photoshop and found that it comes with the CS4 browser. The CS4 browser, in turn allows you to open and work on jpegs using ACR. It really makes it very easy to correct exposure, sharpening, pretty much anything you would want to do with an image.

It is a wonderful tool.

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Old Nov 30, 2009, 5:50 PM   #26
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The sharpening tool in ACR is really cool, being able to mask areas you don't want sharpened by using the bottom slider. Zoomed to 100% you can see exactly both what is being shapened and what's being left alone. I don't buy many books these days, but the $40 or so I paid out for a CS4 book by Scott Kelby has been a great investment.
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Old Nov 30, 2009, 6:34 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Chappell View Post
The sharpening tool in ACR is really cool, being able to mask areas you don't want sharpened by using the bottom slider. Zoomed to 100% you can see exactly both what is being shapened and what's being left alone. I don't buy many books these days, but the $40 or so I paid out for a CS4 book by Scott Kelby has been a great investment.
Scott Kelby, now that's a guy whose writing style I enjoy. His books are always an easy read. He gives you enough information to understand a concept, gives you an example or two and then off you go into another discussion. And, I like his sense of humor.

My first photoshop elements book was written by him. I've subsequently bought 3 additional books of his, on various aspects of photography and software.

One of these days I have to get a full blown copy of CS4 instead of using PSE. But Adobe keeps releasing add-ons like ACR and keep adding bits of CS4 features to PSE that really make it hard to justify the expense.( at least, for me)

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Old Nov 30, 2009, 7:29 PM   #28
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Hi Greg

The pics looks fine to my eyes and pretty impressive stuff but reading Ted's comments I'd like to see what the combo can really do .

Ted, thats some really good tips on taking shots of the moon - I would never have known or even thought of any of them.

Greg, regards the book.. is it that good ? Just wondering if its worth picking up esp as ACR and LR basically share a lot of features from high light recover tools, sharpening etc. There is a part fo me thinking of holding until LR3 comes out of beta.

Cheers

Harj

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Old Dec 1, 2009, 12:58 AM   #29
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It's definitely been worth it for me. Learned lots of stuff that would have just remained buried in the program...not that there still isn't more than I'll ever get around to! It stays at my desk with all kinds of book marks and bent page corners.
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Old Dec 1, 2009, 6:16 AM   #30
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I know your right. I remember a stiched image of many images made of the moon (with a telescope).

All those smaller images were taken as the moon progressd through the phases and of the terminator areas.

Any camera lens is a toy when it comes to the moon. A cheap telescope runs circles around it. I just had to give it a go with the new lens. Maybe the weather will be favorable in a couple weeks and I'll give it a go.

Thanks for the advise.

Greg
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