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Old Dec 15, 2009, 9:22 AM   #1
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Default My next "lens"...

...isn't going to be a lens at all, but an accessory I have needed to own for many years. Images like these are pushing me over the edge..

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/re...ssage=33975467

I would imagine one .6 and one .9 and you never again have to think about trying to balance lighting in a landscape via Photoshop, and HDR can become just another four-letter word you can avoid.

The only issue is, those 72mm filter sizes for the 12-60 can get a little expensive....but I'm doing it anyway.
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Old Dec 15, 2009, 9:54 AM   #2
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Hi there, Greg-

I am in agreement. The link showed some really excellent landscape photos. They had an almost HDR quality to them, I guess thanks to the excellence of the Zukio 12-60 lens. At any rate those photos were high please to look at. You must also keep in mind that those were tripod shots as well to achieve that sharpness.

Have a great day and a Merry Christmas.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Dec 15, 2009, 9:57 AM   #3
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A little too rich for my blood but definitely a goal to shoot for in the event of a windfall from somewhere. heheh

Merry Christmas to you, eh?
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Old Dec 15, 2009, 10:37 AM   #4
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Default Thanks for heads up

Hi Greg,
I didn't catch this at DPReview, so thanks. The images as nice as they are, and they are certainly inspiring, make me curious as to how they would look if the pop art filter of the E-620/E-30 were used, instead.

Oh, and one other point I'd like to make. The resolution, composition, exposure and subject matter, all combine to make these stunning - with or without the filters.

Zig
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Old Dec 15, 2009, 11:12 AM   #5
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Greg, I use a couple of ND grads from time to time but with the wide end of the 12-60 you are likely to get a part of the frame blocked out by the mount. I have this problem with one of my wider lenses that is with a 77mm thread and really I should go to the next size of filter to get around it.

It is a different way of shooting but really can help a photo if you are willing to practise.

Sarah, I doubt very much that a tripod would be needed (even though some photographers would have used them for ease of composition) in these lighting conditions even stopped down to get the dof needed.
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Old Dec 15, 2009, 5:48 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark1616 View Post
Greg, I use a couple of ND grads from time to time but with the wide end of the 12-60 you are likely to get a part of the frame blocked out by the mount. I have this problem with one of my wider lenses that is with a 77mm thread and really I should go to the next size of filter to get around it.
I have always been intrigued with the idea but have always figured that the best grad ND filters would be large rectangular ones in a "filter holder" in front of the lens, so you could slide the gradation point up or down to match the horizon for the composition you really want, rather than tilting the camera to match a screw-in filter's gradation point. Y'all got me checking on this and here's a link that confirms that:

http://www.great-landscape-photograp...d-filters.html

The author, "gnugent", notes that that type of filter is made by both Cokin and Lee, with the Lee filters being better but much more expensive.

I did a quick look at B&H and they're both expensive, particularly since the filter sets don't seem to include the filter holder which presumably is a different one for every lens you might want to use the filters on. The Tiffens don't seem to be less expensive than Lee's, but I didn't spend much time figuring it out.

I don't do enough landscape photography to make this kind of an investment, but if you're interested you might want to check out that article and the filter systems he (she?) discusses. It does seen to me that for the price of these things, it might make more sense to buy the rectangular filter set and a separate filter holder, and have some compositional flexibility. I'm interested in what you conclude.

Ted
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Old Dec 15, 2009, 5:52 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tkurkowski View Post
I have always been intrigued with the idea but have always figured that the best grad ND filters would be large rectangular ones in a "filter holder" in front of the lens, so you could slide the gradation point up or down to match the horizon for the composition you really want, rather than tilting the camera to match a screw-in filter's gradation point. Y'all got me checking on this and here's a link that confirms that:

http://www.great-landscape-photograp...d-filters.html

The author, "gnugent", notes that that type of filter is made by both Cokin and Lee, with the Lee filters being better but much more expensive.

I did a quick look at B&H and they're both expensive, particularly since the filter sets don't seem to include the filter holder which presumably is a different one for every lens you might want to use the filters on. The Tiffens don't seem to be less expensive than Lee's, but I didn't spend much time figuring it out.

I don't do enough landscape photography to make this kind of an investment, but if you're interested you might want to check out that article and the filter systems he (she?) discusses. It does seen to me that for the price of these things, it might make more sense to buy the rectangular filter set and a separate filter holder, and have some compositional flexibility. I'm interested in what you conclude.

Ted
It's not too bad with different lens threads as it is only the screw mount that varies and then you use the same holder. Within the holder then you have (as you rightly say) the ability to slide the filter up and down as well as rotate them to any angle to create the desired effect. Also you can stack filtes. I use Cokin and my holder allows up to 3 at once but usually I will use just one or two.
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Old Dec 15, 2009, 5:54 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark1616 View Post
It's not too bad with different lens threads as it is only the screw mount that varies and then you use the same holder. Within the holder then you have (as you rightly say) the ability to slide the filter up and down as well as rotate them to any angle to create the desired effect. Also you can stack filtes. I use Cokin and my holder allows up to 3 at once but usually I will use just one or two.
Thanks, Mark - that makes sense. But then why do you get vignetting?

BTW, how much do the filter holder and the screw mounts cost? I had a hard time finding that at B&H.

Ted

Last edited by tkurkowski; Dec 15, 2009 at 5:57 PM.
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Old Dec 15, 2009, 7:17 PM   #9
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Quote:
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Thanks, Mark - that makes sense. But then why do you get vignetting?

BTW, how much do the filter holder and the screw mounts cost? I had a hard time finding that at B&H.

Ted
It is only on wider lenses where the holder can start to obstruct the field of view.

This photo shows how the holder is mounted so you can see the potential problem.

http://www.popphoto.com/var/ezflow_s...llery_main.jpg

Check this link for what you will need. These are the P filters which are the norm for a lens with a 72mm thread.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/buy/Fi...9/N/4291074964
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Old Dec 15, 2009, 7:21 PM   #10
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Thanks, Mark. That's helpful.

Ted
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