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Old Dec 19, 2009, 10:51 AM   #1
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Default Close enough?

These are some of my macro projects. I need to improve my skills so all comments are welcome.
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Old Dec 19, 2009, 11:07 AM   #2
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What lens did you shoot the fly with? The flower is a tad soft.
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Old Dec 19, 2009, 1:31 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gjtoth View Post
What lens did you shoot the fly with? The flower is a tad soft.
The famous 50mm F2. Yep, I agree the flower shot is too soft. Thanks.
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Old Dec 19, 2009, 7:15 PM   #4
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Hi Jacob

Don't know much about macro photography but both Greg's and SteveR are the people that should be able to really help out.

My thoughts - the composition is good but the focusing is off on all three shots, although No 2, it could well be that you were shooting at f2 and the DOF is gonna be pretty thin. We're these hand held or on a tripod (a must for macro work) and do you use a flash ?

Here's some really handy tips on macro:

http://dgrin.com/showthread.php?t=143373


Cheers

Harj


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Old Dec 19, 2009, 10:47 PM   #5
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Default My take.....

You can correct me if I'm wrong.

Problem 1: The way I see macro is you need to stop down much more than in other photography because of extremely short distance to the subject. This is a consequence that cannot be avoided. I've tried messing with limited DOF in macros, and its tough!

Problem 2: So, if we stop down we will loose shutter speed. If we have 1/1000 at f2 then we are down to 1/60 at f8. I've looked through my natural light macros and the keepers were limited to about f11 and shutter speeds limited to around the 1/60 second range. That was in full sun and there were many shots (most) taken that were rubbish. Slow shutter speed macros can be tough!

Now Problem 1 requires we stop down, and problem 2 is we need shutter speed to get a sharp image. We quickly paint ourselves into a corner. We either need substancial support for the camera (as well as a subject that isn't moveing) or we need a flash to gain our shutterspeed back.

I think your main problem is slow shutter speed causing soft results.

My experience is that even a pop-up flash works well with the 50 f2. I'd give that a go and see where that leads.

I rarely use a tripod, but I'm looking for any support to get as stable of a shot as possible. Its important as much for maintaining the focal plane where you want it as to prevent motion blur in the shot.

Greg

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Old Dec 20, 2009, 12:32 AM   #6
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Hi Greg,

Very well commented. Those are exactly my problems. I did not use tripod for those shots. When you zoom in that close to the subject, the DOF is so shallow, any minor movement caused the softness of the final image.

I'll try using the flash next time, hopefully I'll get some sharper macro images.
Thanks for the feedback, it really helps.
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Old Dec 20, 2009, 10:15 AM   #7
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Another excellent topic. I too am of the get as much light as possible, and then stop down as much as possible school of thought to obtain more DOF and sharp focus when doing macros.

There will be times when you are out and about and you do not have either the 50mm or 35mm macro lenses with you. Then you are forced to create a "work around." Here is one I took this summer using the Oly 25mm lens.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Dec 20, 2009, 12:13 PM   #8
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Greg and Sara have covered it pretty well.

I'll also add the obvious: remove your lens shade to keep its' shadow from falling on the subject, but the interplay of natural light and shadows can enhance your image.

This one was taken at f5 and 1/500sec:
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