Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Olympus dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Dec 21, 2009, 10:09 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

Greg-

It looks like the thread is off and running. You've got a bunch of excellent photos. That is a great start,

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 23, 2009, 9:41 AM   #22
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 42
Default

whitepass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 25, 2009, 8:24 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 1,241
Default What's in focus... You decide!

At f2 and minimum focus the 50 macro has a depth of field of 4/100ths of an inch. If you stop down to f16, the depth of field increases to nearly 1/3 inch. It is clear from these figures that not everything will be in focus. Its up to you to choose what is in focus and what transitions into bokeh.

I like to imagine I could slide a transparent sheet the thickness of the depth of field into my scene and anything within the thickness of that sheet would become sharp.

I'll use a dragonfly pic as an example. You can see where the sheet would lie. You can see where it passes through the wing, the two front legs on the close side and the head....




This sheet of focus lies in a plane that is parallel to the front of the lens. You can twist the camera to some degree and bring new areas into focus at the expense of other areas which now lie outside the plane. When you see a pleasing scene in the finder, get that shot.

Here's anothe dragonfly. See the plane of focus?



Here's one where I had a choice. Keep the lower body in the plane of focus, twist it so the head and wing control parts were brought into focus, or stop down more (from f16) to try to get both in focus.



You can line up with the length of the body.



Or square up with the front of the face.



Or bring off subject areas into focus to add a different feel to the photo.



But you cant have everything in focus, even at f20!




Greg

Last edited by fldspringer; Dec 25, 2009 at 8:30 AM.
fldspringer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 26, 2009, 8:41 AM   #24
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 1,241
Default Focus Stacking

Its a great time to talk about another possibility it increase depth of field and use lower apertures to limit the softening of diffraction. The process is called focus stacking.

Focus stacking is taking multiple exposures of a subject, each with a carefully measured distance from the subject, and putting them together via software.

I don't play with this. It is more a studio operation with micrometer adjustable optical rails to carefully move the camera (or subject) at exacting steps a few microns. As you can imagine, the subject won't be active insects, but the results are astounding!

No matter how good one may think they are at a give dicipline, there are those that raise the bar. Here is a site where you can see the results of the stacking process, as well as some of the equipment they use to accomplish the task.

Check out the "Technical and Studio Photography" section of the image galleries. http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/ There are also examples of pics taken with microscope objectives.

I shoot by the seat of my pants and I won't be competing with these guys and gals. They are Good!!!

Greg
fldspringer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 26, 2009, 6:44 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
zig-123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Posts: 5,145
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by fldspringer;1031487

I shoot by the seat of my pants and I won't be competing with these guys and gals. They are [I
Good!!![/I]

Greg

Hey Greg,

Thanx for the link to this particular site. I've not seen it b4.

And, however you shoot. Wether it be by the seat of your pants or whatever,
keep doing what it is you're doing 'cause it sure works. Mighty impressive macro photography by any measure.

Zig
zig-123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 26, 2009, 10:32 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 6,483
Default

Good lord, these bugs are huge! That's macro on another level.
Greg Chappell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 27, 2009, 9:42 AM   #27
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 1,241
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by zig-123 View Post
Hey Greg,

Thanx for the link to this particular site. I've not seen it b4.

And, however you shoot. Wether it be by the seat of your pants or whatever,
keep doing what it is you're doing 'cause it sure works. Mighty impressive macro photography by any measure.

Zig
I have great fun chasing bugs around. I'm not someone that goes the extra mile to make a photo "perfect". I don't clone. I don't stick bugs in the refrig. I don't use backdrops, whiteboxes, .... That's what I mean by "seat of my pants". When I go out, I have no idea what I'll be shooting.

I just shoot the critters in their own element and what I get is what I get.

Thanks for the comments.

Greg
fldspringer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 27, 2009, 9:51 AM   #28
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 1,241
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Chappell View Post
Good lord, these bugs are huge! That's macro on another level.
I don't know if your talking mine, or the referenced website. If your talking mine, then visit the site. They play with magnifications that are beyond what I will ever do.

I do like to shoot close. I like perspective that is outside what is normally seen in day to day life. I find it fun to visit the bug world. Its neat to observe their sometimes brutal existence.

Bugs are not for everyone, but its fun to me.

Greg
fldspringer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 27, 2009, 7:13 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

Sorry, no bugs here, Greg-

This was taken with an E-620 equipped with the Zukio 50mm macro lens.

Sarah Joyce
Attached Images
 

Last edited by mtclimber; Dec 27, 2009 at 7:29 PM.
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 3, 2010, 1:01 AM   #30
Senior Member
 
mr.sneezy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 203
Default Hoya flower ZD35mm macro

My first attempt at flower macro with a new ZD 35mm lens, on an E-520, not cropped.
I should not have done it in direct sunlight, I think it bleaches the subtle pink colour out of the outer 'petal'.

PS. the inner star is 10mm across...
Attached Images
 
mr.sneezy is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 2:08 PM.