Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Olympus dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jan 3, 2010, 8:27 AM   #31
Senior Member
 
boBBrennan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Arlington, Texas USA
Posts: 3,566
Default

.....I like this photo, IMO nicely done.
____
boBB
boBBrennan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 5, 2010, 12:11 AM   #32
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 6,521
Default

Comin' in on this late....some orchids shot with an E30, 70-300+EX25 and FL50R fitted with the Demb bounce attachment. In-camera JPEG's processed in Adobe Camera RAW.







Greg Chappell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 5, 2010, 6:10 AM   #33
Senior Member
 
zig-123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Posts: 5,157
Default Maybe late, but worth the wait

Hi Greg,

I always learn something when I review the exif data for the images you post.
Your E-30 gallery has some great examples of how far Olympus has come in improving their cameras dynamic range. There are a lot of high contrast images showing great detail in the shadow areas. Not to mention a lot more great images of the orchid

For those interested in seeing the gallery:

http://gmchappell.smugmug.com/Other/...57711022_M6VUZ

Very nicely done.

Zig
zig-123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 8, 2010, 10:37 PM   #34
Senior Member
 
mr.sneezy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 203
Default More macro from the ZD 35mm lens

I spotted this spider in our back yard at last night, so used it for some macro experimenting.

Interesting thing is in one shot there is much more colour than the others. Now I think (but not sure) that this was a shot where I used only a LED torch at close range to light it up (100mm away). Perhaps the LED's UV emissions make it fluoresce a bit.

The other shots were done while holding a Metz mecablitz 48 AF-1 in one hand (remote slave mode) and the camera in the other.
What I learned from that is the position of the flash can completely change the look of the shot.

Most shots ARE cropped. I'm very happy with the ZD 35mm lens, money well spent.
Martin
Attached Images
    
mr.sneezy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 14, 2010, 2:20 AM   #35
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Washington State
Posts: 930
Default

Damn, there are some really awesome shots in this thread. You guys take some great pics. I'm going to have to look into one of the Oly macro lenses even if I do love my old school glass.
jelow1966 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 14, 2010, 7:26 AM   #36
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 1,241
Default Legacy glass is good

Quote:
Originally Posted by jelow1966 View Post
Damn, there are some really awesome shots in this thread. You guys take some great pics. I'm going to have to look into one of the Oly macro lenses even if I do love my old school glass.
For macro, there is no reason not to use the "old school" macro glass. Truth be told, I can think of no other area that needs the fancy focus stuff than macro.

Viewfinder may get quite dim as you stop down though.

I've seen sone awesome shots with a reversed 50 f1.8 which sells for almost nothing. The OM 90 macro is also a gem, but sell for a bit more. There is some OM with a short focal length (25mm or so) that dusts our current stuff for pure magnification. They sell for big money even today.

Legacy is alive and well with macro.

Greg

Greg
fldspringer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 14, 2010, 3:12 PM   #37
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Washington State
Posts: 930
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by fldspringer View Post
For macro, there is no reason not to use the "old school" macro glass. Truth be told, I can think of no other area that needs the fancy focus stuff than macro.

Viewfinder may get quite dim as you stop down though.

I've seen sone awesome shots with a reversed 50 f1.8 which sells for almost nothing. The OM 90 macro is also a gem, but sell for a bit more. There is some OM with a short focal length (25mm or so) that dusts our current stuff for pure magnification. They sell for big money even today.

Legacy is alive and well with macro.

Greg

Greg
I've worked with an old Canon 50mm reversed as well as with it stacked. Nice simple set up that is light and easy to tote around in the field. Haven't figured a way to work it with a ring flash (duct tape comes to mind) though bounced flash works fine. I also like my Tamron 60-300 macro since it will work for both macro and birds. Like you say there is no need for auto anything with macro which is why I have never bought any Oly lenses, but with living things it would be nice to focus wide open and then just press the shutter and not have to always stop down while trying to maintain focus an hope the subject doesn't move.

I'm thinking of adding the 50mm macro Pentax to my collection since most of my other lenses are K mount and I'd be able to shoot film with it as well. Not as versatile as the Tamron but lighter and a true 1:1 (I think so anyway).

You're pictures are great, gives me something to shoot for although I tend more to the non moving subjects like water drops and lichen etc. Thanks for sharing them, I'm sure I'm not the only one who is inspired by them. But how do you get so close? Bugs tend to get well out of my way long before I can even get to 1:4 except for ants on an anthill. Then the only trick is to not get bit. Something to practice I guess when the weather is better. At least when the sun is bright I can focus stopped down some.

John
jelow1966 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 3:35 AM.