Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Olympus dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Dec 21, 2009, 8:33 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
zig-123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Posts: 5,158
Default Tempers Flare

Yesterday was a lousy day to be a bird. I'm always amazed at these little creatures and their ability to survive under trying circumstances. I took a bunch of photos of birds at the feeder. Naturally, most of them came out awful due to my shooting through a storm window. But a few are good enough to depict the conditions in which these little critters endure.
Attached Images
 
zig-123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Dec 21, 2009, 9:07 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
gjtoth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Louisville, KY, USA
Posts: 6,938
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by zig-123 View Post
Yesterday was a lousy day to be a bird. I'm always amazed at these little creatures and their ability to survive under trying circumstances. I took a bunch of photos of birds at the feeder. Naturally, most of them came out awful due to my shooting through a storm window. But a few are good enough to depict the conditions in which these little critters endure.
Looks like that chickadee is no match for that finch They do get a little testy. It's amazing how resilient they are, isn't it?
__________________
Gary ---- "The best camera is the one you have with you."
<><~~~~~~~~~~~
Pentax K-70 ~ Panasonic FZ1000
My Gallery

--
Hebrews 13:3
gjtoth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 21, 2009, 11:53 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 6,522
Default

[QUOTE=zig-123;1030101]Yesterday was a lousy day to be a bird.QUOTE]

YUK! Birds do have it tough. I saw something about several thousands of birds dying out in West Texas this past weekend due to some disease related to the recent cold weather out there.

It was a beautiful day here! Supposed to be 68 degrees today, near 70 tomorrow. Supposed to get "colder" later this week, but I'm not complaining after watching the games on the east coast yesterday!

Greg Chappell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 21, 2009, 4:05 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
zig-123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Posts: 5,158
Default

Hi Greg,
I'm envious!! This weekends storm really drove home the point that Winter has arrived. I didn't get much of a chance to get out and take pictures today as there was too much to clean up in the yard from the heavy snowfall.

By the way, I noticed that your image was captured using an E-30. Congrats on getting it. I really believe that your gonna love it.

As you know, theres been a lot of chatter over at DPReview regarding the relative merits of each. I'd like to get your impressions.

Zig
zig-123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 21, 2009, 4:18 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
zig-123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Posts: 5,158
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gjtoth View Post
Looks like that chickadee is no match for that finch They do get a little testy. It's amazing how resilient they are, isn't it?

Hi Gary,

It's interesting to observe the pecking order(pun intended) of these songbirds and how they interact. From what I've seen in observing them for the last year
is that Chickadees and Tufted Titmouse tend to come to the feeder together. They don't fight each other at all. Just get the seed and fly off to eat it. They, however, are very fast and prefer to take the seed, fly off, eat it, and then comeback again. The Goldfinches tend to be a good deal more aggressive and fight with the other birds. All except for the house finch-they usually stay away from those guys. Ironically, the Gold finches tend to stay at the feeder for long periods of time. It allows me a good deal of time to set up and take as many shots as I want.

Of all the birds that visit the feeder, my favorite is the Chickadee. It's small very fast, difficult to capture correctly-the black band around the eyes can be tricky to get all the details. But it's a very pretty bird.

Zig
zig-123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 21, 2009, 11:21 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

Zig-

That photo really looks very, very cold! You have really had a noreaster! years ago I lived up in Hingham, but today we are in Oregon right on the coast.

Have a great day and a Merry Christmas.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 22, 2009, 7:08 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
zig-123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Posts: 5,158
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
Zig-

That photo really looks very, very cold! You have really had a noreaster! years ago I lived up in Hingham, but today we are in Oregon right on the coast

Sarah Joyce

Hi Sarah,
I can well understand why you chose to live in Hingham while working as a pilot. It's a great South Shore bedroom community to Boston.
The commute to the airport through the Tunnel wasn't much fun though.

Personally, I've not been to Oregon. But, I've seen a lot of photos showcasing the beauty of the state. Another place on my bucket list of locales to visit.

Zig
zig-123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 22, 2009, 10:14 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

Hi there, Zig-

You are so correct. The commute from Higham to Logan was a challenge. I only had to do it for a year, as I moved up through TWA and subsequently was based in different domiciles. St. Louis was no piece of cake either.

Now, we are just retired folks, enjoying a bit of beautiful Oregon.

Have a great day and a Merry Christmas.

Sarah Joyce
Attached Images
 
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 26, 2009, 9:31 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 6,522
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by zig-123 View Post
Hi Greg,

By the way, I noticed that your image was captured using an E-30. Congrats on getting it. I really believe that your gonna love it.

Zig
Never made it up to Wichita Falls to my parents for Christmas due to the snow storm they had up there. I tried today and got within 49 miles when the highway turned to ice and I had to turn around....they handle this stuff in Texas like you guys would probably handle 6 weeks of 100 degree weather.

After getting back home, taking two asprin and having a couple of drinks I took my E30 out for the first extended amount of time late this afternoon to try out the exposure system and to see how the auto gradation setting with this camera works. Best place to do this was downtown.

I have the exposure shift option when using multi-segment metering set to +2/6 stop as they seen to have the E30 set up very conservatively on the side of underexposure and I prefer to keep the histogram set as far to the right as possible. Shooting in the high contrast of the shade and light downtown the camera really does a good job of keeping highlights and shadows under control. Once the shade starts dominating a scene, using a -1/3 stop exposure compensation seems to go a good job of keeping the highlights from going off the right-side of the histogram.

I would not use auto gradation with certain subjects. I don't think it would be the thing to do shooting at a night baseball game or at the hockey rink for a Stars game, but out and about during the day, as long as you can keep the ISO set to ISO 320 or lower, I think I am going to leave it on. I've played enough trying RAW and JPEG files in low light to know I prefer the cameras' JPEG files and low noise filter setting up to ISO 2000 over anything I can do to a converted RAW file. Noise/grain is a nice, tight film-like grain pattern to it, which I do not mind at all. I'll have to verify by making a few large prints, but I bet it's a not even visible on a print paper.

This is the fastest shooting camera I have used since when I was using a Nikon F4s. The 12-60 and 50-200 SWD lenses just bang into focus in no time and I'm really going to enjoy the 5 frames per second this spring at the track and for sequential shooting at Rangers' games. I did buy the grip and I really like the feel of the camera. The vertical release is really sweet, and thank god they did not make a special, ultra-expensive battery for the grip like they did with the E1. It even came with an adaptor where you can use 6 AA batteries in a pinch.

Really like the combination of open shadows and controlled brighter levels in these type subjects using auto gradation...






Late afternoon (after 3pm) light. I have the camera set up to not lock exposure when I lock focus. When I orginally shot this, focussing on the sunlit old copula and then re-composing, the exposure with auto gradation created a flatter looking highlighted tower, so I shot it again, using the AE lock when I focussed, then re-composed, which resulted in much better-looking highlights. Bringing up the shadows created a little more grain in the shadows, but as I said earlier, it's a nicer grainly-look vs. blotchy noise.





Image stabilization looks great. Here's a shot at the 130mm setting of the 50-200 SWD..



Zoomed out to 200mm..



The add the EC20, extending the effective focal length to 400mm..


Last edited by Greg Chappell; Dec 27, 2009 at 8:07 PM.
Greg Chappell is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 5:33 PM.