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Old Dec 25, 2009, 8:32 PM   #11
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Default A photo with traditional dry flies

Here is a photo of some small traditional dry flies used to entice Trout.

Again, the dime is used to give the viewer a sense of scale. In case anyone's interested, I've caught wild trout using all of these flies.
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Old Dec 27, 2009, 10:22 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by zig-123 View Post
Here is a photo of some small traditional dry flies used to entice Trout.

Again, the dime is used to give the viewer a sense of scale. In case anyone's interested, I've caught wild trout using all of these flies.
I'm certainly interested. I find your flies very interesting. Couple Qs. How much damage do the trout do to your handywork and do you do repairs it they do get messed up.

Greg
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Old Dec 27, 2009, 11:40 AM   #13
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How much damage do the trout do to your handywork and do you do repairs it they do get messed up.

Greg
Hi Greg,

Trout flies, generally are remarkably resilient and, if properly tied can catch a couple of dozen fish. Most of the damage is actually done by the fisherman when trying to extricate the fly from the fish's jaw. In order to avoid damaging the fish and fly, I bend the barb down on all my hooks. This makes removing the fly a snap. I also use a 9" long pair of forceps to grasp the hook and push it back thru the point of entry.

The materials used to make these dry flies are hackle from birds and fur from fox, rabbit and other critters. These materials are very durable and
naturally water resistant.

Now, it may sound noble or something to use barbless hooks, but I simply do that for my own safety and then to extend the life of the fly and the fish.
I've been on too many fishing trips where the nearest hospital is 3hours away traveling on a logging road. One thing you don't want to do is put a hook in your face and then not be able to get it out.

Actually, most often, you snap a fly off long before the life of the fly is spent. Catching it on an Alder or trying to horse a fish in too hard.

Sorry for being long winded. Probably more than you wanted to know.

Zig
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