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Old Jan 25, 2010, 12:05 PM   #1
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Default New friend in our backyard

Taken with a E-620/70-300mm...

I had enough time to spot him through the kitchen window, put on the 70-300, put on my winter boots and jacket; go outside and walk closer to him; and take the shot



Made damn sure that @ 300mm that I had at least 1/300!

Last edited by TekiusFanatikus; Jan 25, 2010 at 12:08 PM.
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Old Jan 25, 2010, 12:21 PM   #2
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Default great work

Quote:
Originally Posted by TekiusFanatikus View Post
Taken with a E-620/70-300mm...

Made damn sure that @ 300mm that I had at least 1/300!
Hi,

Great shot and nicely focused through the trees.

The best lessons that we learn from are through our own experiences. That missed shot of the fox will never let you forget to check your shutter speed, AF setting, I.S., etc.

I'd say that lesson will pay you back in dividends for many years.
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Old Jan 25, 2010, 3:00 PM   #3
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I will echo Zig's comment about nice focus job through the trees.

The newer Olympus DSLR's are so much better in recording images like these when it comes to not producing numerous hot spots/blown highlights in the small, sunlit areas around the main subject.

Did you wind up dialing in any negative exposure compensation here, or was this take with -0- exposure compensation? I would have automatically dialed in -1/3 stop without even thinking due to the amount of shaded area to try and keep the metering system from biasing the exposure too much that way and going off the right-hand side of the histogram with the small areas of sunlit detail.

Whatever you did....or didn't do, it worked very well.
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Old Jan 26, 2010, 8:26 AM   #4
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I didn't touch the exposure at all. I had it on P and made sure the shutter speed was at least 1/300 (thus I had bumped it up to ISO 400). I also made sure I had the sun at my back rather than my side. That's about how much thinking went into it. Plus, I had already taken much time to get to this position, so I didn't want to take too much time and risk that the deer runs away.

It was very sunny out and the sky was blue with no clouds. Perfect day IMO.

I did have some issues initially to focus on the beast... the 70-300 can sometimes be a PITA when it comes to AF. But I moved my location where there was more of the deer to put the AF on and the problem seemed to go away.

With the 70-300, I often have to zoom out, then gradually zoom in and check the AF at every step to make sure it doesn't start searching for focus. PITA.

Last edited by TekiusFanatikus; Jan 26, 2010 at 8:28 AM. Reason: Clarity
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