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Old Jan 25, 2010, 4:56 PM   #1
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Default First pics using the new lens adapter

I have no idea what I'm doing but these two pics are the best I've taken so far with my new lens adapter and old lens. I'm very pleased with them even though they're not the sharpest they could be. No tripod used w/ 250mm lens. And it's heavy xD
Yeah, I know, another cardinal haha. Oh and if someone wants to remove that huge blurry leaf in the first pic, that would be awesome. I tried and failed.
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Old Jan 26, 2010, 7:24 AM   #2
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Hi,

It's always great fun and exciting to take a lens from the past, mount it onto a your new dslr and start snapping away. The initial results aren't always exactly you had hoped for. BUT, that's the beauty of digital, you can take as many shots as you want and discard the ones you don't like.

Your experience is pretty much what everyone goes through in the process of determining the limits of the equipment that your using. You already know that the E-600 is certainly able to deliver very high quality images. So, the next step to improve your 'keeper' rate, is determining the Kalimar 250mm lens' aperture "sweet spot" as well as using a high enough shutter speed to eliminate motion blur.


When you have time and a nice sunny day, I would suggest you try the following:

Go outside and set your camera on a tripod. If none available, then a place on a table or stand. set up a target 20ft away, by placing an inanimate object (soda can of doll)

Try the following settings:
ISO: 200
White balance: auto
mode: manual
AF: single point-center S-AF
set timer: 2 sec


Most lenses are sharpest at 1 or 2 f-stops from wide open (the lowest value on the aperture ring). As an example, if your lens' lowest value is 5.6 (on the aperture ring) then set it at f8.

The next step is to adjust your shutter speed until the meter on your camera is at 0 or at the center.

You can use 'live view' to fine tune the focus. Live view has an option that opens up a green box in the center of your LCD screen when you engage the green box, by pressing the center OK button on the control panel, you can magnify the subject ten times. Once focused, you can exit live view and take a shot or two. Then take a series of shots using different aperture values and shutter speeds to compare against the original shot taken at f8.

You can then download your images and take a look at which are the best.
This exercise helps to determine which is the optimal aperture for this particular lens.

The other important point to remember is the shutter speed has to be fast enough to eliminate blur imparted by you when hand holding the camera. Since your lens is a 250mm lens, the slowest shutter speed, when hand holding the camera should be 1/250 sec and preferably higher.

Hope this helps.
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Old Jan 26, 2010, 7:55 AM   #3
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One other thing I'd like to add to Zig's response: how much were these images cropped? It's often frustrating how much focal length you really need to photograph small birds. So, the natural tendency is to over-crop images of small birds. That can lead to some very un-sharp results. I'm not familiar with the lens you're using, but especially with small birds you want to keep cropping to a minimum with consumer grade telephoto lenses. Most of us don't have unlimited funds - but for wildlife it means you have to work on your technique to get closer until you can afford some longer glass - and even on a 4/3 sensor, 250mm is agonizingly short for small bird shooting. So you have to keep expectations realistic with regards to performance.
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Old Jan 28, 2010, 10:01 AM   #4
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Sorry for the late reply, but thanks so much for the advice. I'm trying to learn what the lens is capable of since it's my first time shooting in manual mode. I'm so used to just changing a couple things (WB, etc) and shooting. I still have so much to learn!
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Old Feb 17, 2010, 2:06 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennlynn130 View Post
Sorry for the late reply, but thanks so much for the advice. I'm trying to learn what the lens is capable of since it's my first time shooting in manual mode. I'm so used to just changing a couple things (WB, etc) and shooting. I still have so much to learn!
As an old glass lover let me add that you can also use Aperture mode and let the camera set the shutter speed. That's how I shoot most of the time, adjusting the exposure compensation to get results I like. With my lenses that means -1.3 most of the time. Or you can leave it at zero and set the shutter with the aperture open more than you are going to use, then stop down and take the picture. The first way is easier, the second works well with old T-mount lenes as a way to get the camera to under or over expose w/o fiddling with any controls.

And what the above poster said about small birds is true. Keep you expectations low, I have shot hundreds of shots of small birds and kept a very few.

Best of luck. BTW what lens are you using?
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