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Old Feb 6, 2010, 7:28 AM   #1
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Default Super FP. When and where ?

Guy's, I'm trying to understand the full benefits of the various flash modes available with my E-520 and the external flash (Metz 48 AF-1 in this case).

Anybody use Super FP mode, and can tell me why and when they need to use it ?

Thanks,
Martin
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Old Feb 6, 2010, 9:36 AM   #2
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Your cameras' shutter will sync with flash up to 1/180 second. For indoor shooting that works fine, but if you were outside and wanted to use flash as a fill or main light source, 1/180 second often is not fast enough for ambient light levels. You need to be able to use 1/250, 1/500 or even 1/1000 second in order to obtain a good exposure.

That's what FP flash mode is all about. Instead of a single pop, FP mode has the flash emit several very fast pops, allowing the cameras' shutter to be able to be sync'd at those much faster shutter speeds.

There is a penalty for FP mode, and that penalty is working distance. FP mode is useable at shorter distances than normal flash modes because of the power it takes to work in that mode. Check the manual for your flash to see what those are. If you use bounce flash or a light modifyer like the Demb bounce attachment or dome, the working distance is shortened even further.

Last edited by Greg Chappell; Feb 6, 2010 at 10:14 AM.
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Old Feb 6, 2010, 9:42 AM   #3
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This is good to know !

....... I learn something everyday reading through "Steve's". The participants AND the moderators are simply the best.

Thanks everyone,
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Old Feb 8, 2010, 10:19 AM   #4
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I determined the maximum usable ISO 100 fill flash distance with my Metz 48 on a sunny day is only about 8-9 feet at 1/180th in the normal mode using -1EV flash compensation. In the FP mode it would be less depending on the shutter speed selected. How much less I've yet to determine. The advertised GN number for the Metz 48 is 153 at 105mm but when I checked mine in the normal sync mode it only gave a GN (ft) of about 62 at 24mm and 77 at 105mm (EFL).
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Last edited by turbines; Feb 8, 2010 at 10:28 AM.
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Old Feb 11, 2010, 7:32 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Chappell View Post
Your cameras' shutter will sync with flash up to 1/180 second. For indoor shooting that works fine, but if you were outside and wanted to use flash as a fill or main light source, 1/180 second often is not fast enough for ambient light levels. You need to be able to use 1/250, 1/500 or even 1/1000 second in order to obtain a good exposure.
Thanks, for that nice explanation. The Oly owners manuals sadly lack in practical explanations.

That makes me wonder, is there a 'Dummies Guide to the Olympus dSLR' type book avaialble ?

(If not there's an idea for an author among us)
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Old Feb 11, 2010, 9:02 PM   #6
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Default Camera manuals are like manuals you get with a new car!

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Originally Posted by mr.sneezy View Post
The Oly owners manuals sadly lack in practical explanations.
Actually the camera manual is just like a manual you get with a new car, tells you where the controls are but it doesn't teach you how to drive!


For that you take lessons from someone who already knows how to drive, from books, or from videos.


The camera manual teaches you where the controls are, but it doesn't teach you how to take pictures.


Again you learn from your fellow photographers, or books, or videos.
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Old Feb 12, 2010, 5:04 AM   #7
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Again you learn from your fellow photographers, or books, or videos.
Yep, that's why we have forums. Books are great if they actually use the same jargon as the manufacturers of the device your trying to use. I've read some in-depth articles on using external flashes for instance, but the terms don't all line up with what Oly calls some functions.
Sometimes if anything I can end up with even more questions after reading such general info !

Thanks guy's for your input,
Martin
PS. I have yet another dedicated Oly question to go ask right now...
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Old Feb 12, 2010, 7:55 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by mr.sneezy View Post
Books are great if they actually use the same jargon as the manufacturers of the device your trying to use. I've read some in-depth articles on using external flashes for instance, but the terms don't all line up with what Oly calls some functions.
Every manufacturer has their own terms for things, like "accelerator" or "gas pedal" on a car.

Camera manufacturers can't even agree on what to call an external flash, some just call it a flash while others call it a speedlite, and others call it a strobe (while usually that refers to a much larger unit).

For FP mode many manufacturers call it high speed sync or HSS.
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Old Feb 13, 2010, 3:41 PM   #9
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One other great advantage of FP (which I admit I haven't used though I used the same feature on my C-2500L) is that it allows you to use shutter speeds fast enough to capture action. The 2500 would synch up to 10,000 which meant it was able to break water coming out of a faucet into single drops (sort of, getting it into focus was always very hit and miss). Another advantage is in macro and close up work where you might want a faster shutter to not only mitigate shake but to allow you to use a larger aperature. BTW with my e-500 I have found that with a manual flash (shoe or ring) in manual mode on the camera shutter speeds up to 320 can be used. 250 is best as 320 can leave a dark line at the very bottom but with cropping it can be easily removed. 400 will work if you only want the top 2/3 of the pic.
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