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Old Feb 10, 2010, 9:18 PM   #11
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dugger, as zig mentioned keh(mostly used items) & b&h(new &used) are good places to look i also use adorama. the 14 -54mm 2.8\3.5 (can be had for $300 used if you look around) or the 12-60mm($800-$975) as jacob mentioned are great choices for what you want to photograph. don't under estimate those kit lenses however they are extremely optically good, even if the build quality seems lacking. i still use kit lenses on extended hikes with my 420 and leave the heavy glass & e-3 home. with a local contrast layer in photoshop & [email protected] unsharp mask the 14-42mm images i print can not be told from the 12-60mm in most cases. as zig had mentioned for what you want to photograph a flash would be something you might consider.
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Old Feb 10, 2010, 10:02 PM   #12
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Thanks for the info. I am planning on just putting the supplied caps on when i am not shooting. Save the money for a better lens after i get the hang of this.

What is the best all around lens that i should get? I will use it indoors outdoors, kids, and my dogs. Anybody know sites where they sell used lens?

As much as I appreciate your enthusiasm, I would suggest you hold off buying any lenses mainly because you already have two really good all around lenses now.

Instead, I would suggest that you really get comfortable with your camera and all of it's functions as well as getting the most out of the lenses that you have. Meanwhile, you can also read a lot of information on all the Olympus lenses on sites like Wrotniak.net and Biofos.com. These are two great sites that provide tremendous information on all things Olympus.

Give yourself a little time to really think through the different types of photography that you're interested in as it may have you thinking about getting a lens for a specific application.

You mentioned that you wanted to take indoor shots of the kids and your dogs. You might want to consider picking up a used external flash such as an FL-36. Although no longer being made, they can be bought used for around 100 - 125bucks. You'll be really surprised by the quality of the images that your existing outfit can provide simply by adding a flash.

Hope this helps.

Zig
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Old Feb 11, 2010, 5:08 AM   #13
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As much as I appreciate your enthusiasm, I would suggest you hold off buying any lenses mainly because you already have two really good all around lenses now.

Give yourself a little time to really think through the different types of photography that you're interested in as it may have you thinking about getting a lens for a specific application.


Zig
This is super advise. Not everyone uses a camera the same way. For me, telephoto dominates my use, and some others use wide angle much more. I also have a passion for macro, but someone else likes to do portraits.

The kit lenes are a good place to start. Find out how you use your camera, and invest only when you feel a need. You need to develop your own style of photography to know what you need, if anything.

Some of us aquire stuff like its a disease. (I won't mention names on the basis I may incriminate myself). Others shoot kit lenses their whole lives. The other Greg on this forum has recently posted pics from the kit 40-150 and they are outstanding! That and he doesn't need to keep the Chiropractor on speed dial!

Just go use the camera, have fun, don't be afraid to press the shutter button, and be aware that most of our photos go in the trash too.

Greg
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Old Feb 11, 2010, 8:58 AM   #14
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Great advice on this forum. I do know it will be a good long time before i got out and buy another lens. Thanks for all the info.
My one lingering question is. What will a new flash unit do for me indoors that my current one won't? Will it reach farther into a room?

I am a total newbie with this. I have read my manual about 3 times already and keep going back to it while in front of the TV. each time i find something new. My main goal is to learn about my camera and become better at pictures in the coming months.

One of the reasons i bought the olympus is that i have read the kit's lenses i have are an oustanding value.

I did not know about keh.com. That is a nice place.
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Old Feb 11, 2010, 9:32 AM   #15
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Great advice on this forum.
My one lingering question is. What will a new flash unit do for me indoors that my current one won't? Will it reach farther into a room?

I did not know about keh.com. That is a nice place.
The built-in flash is designed to light up your subject for proper exposure. Unfortunately, you can't control where the flash projects light. It simply fires forward making your subject look un-natural.

An external flash provides better control of where you bounce or focus the light because you can turn the flash head just about 360 degrees. So, you can fire the flash with the beam pointed up and use it to fill the area with enough light for proper exposure but NOT have your subject squinting or your having hot spots on your subjects skin.

You also use it outdoors as a fill-in flash so that your subject looks a lot more natural.

I'm just skimming the surface when it comes to using a flash,

Here's a link to Olympus' website. where you can navigate thru their lessons and 'how tos'
http://www.olympusamerica.com/crm/on..._fillflash.asp
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Old Feb 11, 2010, 9:38 AM   #16
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Cool
Thanks for the info
And know for my first two "ok" pictures that i took on day 1.


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Old Feb 11, 2010, 11:00 AM   #17
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The built-in flash is designed to light up your subject for proper exposure. Unfortunately, you can't control where the flash projects light. It simply fires forward making your subject look un-natural.

An external flash provides better control of where you bounce or focus the light because you can turn the flash head just about 360 degrees. So, you can fire the flash with the beam pointed up and use it to fill the area with enough light for proper exposure but NOT have your subject squinting or your having hot spots on your subjects skin.

You also use it outdoors as a fill-in flash so that your subject looks a lot more natural.

I'm just skimming the surface when it comes to using a flash,

Here's a link to Olympus' website. where you can navigate thru their lessons and 'how tos'
http://www.olympusamerica.com/crm/on..._fillflash.asp
Zig is right about direct flash, but even bounce flash isn't as good as what you can get with an accessory that Greg Chappell told us about - the Demb reflector:

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/ol...ttachment.html

I have one and it's really great, and not very expensive. Add one of these to an external flash and you'll get really nice lighting.

Ted
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Old Feb 11, 2010, 11:06 AM   #18
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Cool
Thanks for the info
And know for my first two "ok" pictures that i took on day 1.
Somethng you should know about pictures of living beings (human or animal) is that we naturally look at their eyes. So the eyes really need to be in focus. In your first picture they're not - when you shoot another photo of that (great) dog, put one of the eyes in the center of the viewfinder and press the shutter release halfway down to lock the focus, then recompose the picture and shoot. Of course, not all creatures give you time to do that...

Ted
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Old Feb 11, 2010, 11:19 AM   #19
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I am a total newbie with this. I have read my manual about 3 times already and keep going back to it while in front of the TV. each time i find something new. My main goal is to learn about my camera and become better at pictures in the coming months.
Great - that means you're really interested in photography; otherwise you'd use a point-and-shoot.

Don't forget Zig's suggestion to peruse Wrotniak.net and Biofos.com. Although you can't do that in front of a TV without a wireless laptop. (grin)

Ted
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Old Feb 12, 2010, 5:38 AM   #20
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dugger, a great free resource for external flash use and all that can be done with them is strobist.com also a good alternative to the olympus fl36r&fl50r is the metz 48 af-1, it can be remotely controlled by your 520, has more power and faster recycle times than the fl36r and cost a lot less than fl50r.
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