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Old Feb 22, 2010, 6:59 AM   #1
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Default In all that glass at the Olympics...

I saw one guy with an Olympus strap around his neck! Otherwise, all I've been seeing is Canon and Nikon.

Also, I watched a lot of the long track stuff and behind the skaters, there was a lot of photographers. These guys sport some pretty big lens that most of us, well except fldspringer with his monster, will never get to feel - how does that feel fldspringer?! LOL)

What struck me the most is the different size/length of the lenses that they are all shooting with.
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Old Feb 22, 2010, 7:17 AM   #2
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Yep - a lot of 300mm 2.8 and 400mm 2.8 lenses to be sure. Plus a myriad of other lenses depending on the type of shot. And yes, like most sporting events 99% of the pros are using Canon & Nikon. I don't think any of the other manufacturers have ever really pushed to make traction in that area - it's a tough nut to gain ground on and tough to invest R&D in $7000 lenses before you have a customer base to use them. And it isn't just about the equipment. Nikon Professional Services and Canon Professional Services both have on-site presence there to service gear and provide loaner equipment to the pros. The images from indoors are absolutely the best from any Olympics so far - the high ISO performance tweaks manufacturers have made are really showing up here.
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Old Feb 22, 2010, 8:18 AM   #3
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I've even seen the photographers jockey for positions in the "pit"... fun to watch.
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Old Feb 22, 2010, 8:31 AM   #4
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By the way, if you're interested, here's a write-up in this thread about the workflow the images go through at the AP. Look down to the post by David Harp. Thought it was interesting.
http://www.sportsshooter.com/message...html?tid=35478
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Old Feb 22, 2010, 10:36 AM   #5
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Every single one of these is either a 400mm 2.8 and a d3s, or a 600mm 4, and a d3s...

and each of those manila cases is around $300 by themselves.

This is the nikon staging area before the Olympics started this past week.




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Old Feb 22, 2010, 6:47 PM   #6
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Hi Tek!

Nice post .. and its something that I'd noticed since the Olympics started.. lots of nice big glass !

John's point's are pretty spot on although I wonder if there were a few SonyA700/900 shooters out there ? I think the SHG glass would be just fine amongst all the big C/N lenses but whether Oly's AF system would be able to keep up I doubt it. I think if there was an E5 floating about, then something like the games would have been a pretty good place to test an put a new camera through its paces.

All of those cases look pretty damn tempting!

Cheers

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Old Feb 22, 2010, 7:54 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TekiusFanatikus View Post
I saw one guy with an Olympus strap around his neck! Otherwise, all I've been seeing is Canon and Nikon.

Also, I watched a lot of the long track stuff and behind the skaters, there was a lot of photographers. These guys sport some pretty big lens that most of us, well except fldspringer with his monster, will never get to feel - how does that feel fldspringer?! LOL)

What struck me the most is the different size/length of the lenses that they are all shooting with.
The main reason for the C & N presence is autofocus. I'd say currently Nikon is top dog in most areas, but it costs more as well. What used to be all white lenses has had black lenses become more and more numerous.

Canon's sports presence is in great measure due to its long lenses. You may find some fault in some lenses, many "L" lenses included, but the longest superteles are not to be faulted. They are extremely good and are MUCH less expensive than the Nikon offerings.

As to how my lens "feels", Its just so damned nice since I got the gimbal head for the tripod. Its as easy to handle as a camera with a pancake lens attached. Its effortless. To take that thing out with a 2x telecon and half press the shutter and watch the detail snap in the viewfinder is breathtaking. How does it feel That's for me to know, and unless your going to spend alot of money .....

Greg
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Old Feb 22, 2010, 7:59 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pbjunkiee View Post
Every single one of these is either a 400mm 2.8 and a d3s, or a 600mm 4, and a d3s...

and each of those manila cases is around $300 by themselves.

This is the nikon staging area before the Olympics started this past week.




$15,000 or $20,000 per container. Not for the faint of heart.

Greg
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Old Feb 23, 2010, 7:18 AM   #9
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although I wonder if there were a few SonyA700/900 shooters out there ? I think the SHG glass would be just fine amongst all the big C/N lenses but whether Oly's AF system would be able to keep up I doubt it.
Harj - I'm sure there are some Sony and Oly and Pentax photogs there. The A700 was very much on par with the Canon 40d and Nikon d80 cameras. But people who haven't shot a Nikon or Canon pro level body might not appreciate how big of a gap there is between those mid level cameras and the pro series. Especially when it comes to low light performance. All the mid level cameras are capable of excellent photos but the accuracy / reliability is an order of magnitude greater. For hobbyists it's not usually worth the price (because you need the right lenses to go with those pro bodies as well). But for working pros where you don't have the luxury of 30% keepers it's still a big gap. Even if you talk to Nikon shooters who have used D300 and d3/s cameras they'll tell you - the focus array may be the same but there is no comparison between the two performance wise. The d300 doesn't have the same processing power as the d3. So while the Sony lenses are certainly top notch - they still don't have the focus system on par with the pro sports bodies. But I have seen one photographer that shoots NFL with Sony - it certainly can be done. You're just not going to have the same percentage of keepers.
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Old Mar 16, 2010, 1:56 AM   #10
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I ran into a birder using one of those monster Canon lenses today. I haven't felt my equipment to be so inadequate since I was late starting puberty.
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