Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Olympus dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Apr 11, 2010, 8:48 AM   #21
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TekiusFanatikus View Post
I always thought that Exposure Bias was done after the picture was taken, almost like going through PP (but with RAW information to work with straight from the camera).
No... All you're doing is varying the aperture or shutter speed if you mean Exposure Compensation. If you're shooting in Av (Aperture Priority) mode and use a +EV setting for Exposure Compensation, it's just using a slower shutter speed than metered to give you a brighter exposure. But, because of metering variations, it's usually a better bet to use Manual Exposure in those types of conditions.

Also, you don't want to "push" the exposure (brighten it) using methods other than a wider aperture or slower shutter speed anyway. Noise is going to be worse with an underexposed image, especially if you brighten it later (which will increase it, just as if you used a higher ISO speed to begin with). It's best to make sure your exposure is good up front to keep noise levels down (even leaning towards slight overexposure in some areas if your subjects still look OK). That will reduce your noise levels and increase your Dynamic Range. You don't want to underexpose if shooting at ISO speeds that high. When the signal generated by each photosite is too weak (as it will be in an underexposed image, especially in shadow areas), then it's not high enough above the noise floor and will degrade your image quality.
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 11, 2010, 10:29 AM   #22
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

Jim hit the highlights. I'll also mention that you are going to have shutter lag / focus issues with almost any camera using such a dim lens. A lens like the one you're using does not let in enough light for fast focus. So the lag you're experiencing is the camera trying to figure out what to focus on. An f2.0 lens would be much more appropriate for that type of camera. It MIGHT (big MIGHT) do well with 2.8 lenses but I can't be certain as I haven't run across many sports shooters using that specific camera IN THOSE LIGHTING CONDITIONS.

Don't get too down though. Sports shooting isn't as easy as it looks. Keep practicing and keep seeking feedback and you'll get better quickly.
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 11, 2010, 4:11 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
TekiusFanatikus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: New Brunswick, Canada
Posts: 385
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnG View Post
An f2.0 lens would be much more appropriate for that type of camera. It MIGHT (big MIGHT) do well with 2.8 lenses but I can't be certain as I haven't run across many sports shooters using that specific camera IN THOSE LIGHTING CONDITIONS.
That was going to be my next question. How much shutter speed would I gain going to a 2.8 lens such as SWD's (12-60 or 50-200)? I was thinking about the 1.4 Sigma, but it's a 50mm.

50mm would have been enough for the karate as @70mm, I was filling the frame with the small kids. With the adults, it would have been plenty. And at f1.4, I'm sure it would have been fine. And since they fight around in a relatively small space, the light wouldn't have changed much.
__________________
________________________
AKA Dan
TekiusFanatikus is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:36 PM.