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Old May 20, 2010, 7:51 AM   #1
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Default more observations on 70-300 at high iso?

Following the recent very informative post on high iso I thought I'd share my experience...
Basically I started off trying iso 1600 on my e-520... weirdly I got 99% grainy rubbish except this one, and I think a couple of others. I've no real idea why except perhaps that it didn't need to be cropped (or very little) and the subject was nice and close. I'm thinking that "might" be the secret to iso 1600?? could well be wrong though...

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When I shoot iso100-200 I can crop (hard) and still get a clear (ish) result. Also this fella was about 90 feet away! not bad... but you need better light than we often get..

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Finally this singing robin was at iso-800 and about 12 feet away. I've no idea what the rule of thumb is here. 800 is sometimes ok? All of the ones i took at iso 800 I ran through the free noiseware software and set the filter to "weak noise". Don't really know what I'm doing withh it but the result is ok...

I think so far I'm concluding that the raising the ISO is somewhat like lowering the pixel count.... THe result will be fine but you can't expect to crop so heavy. Also as Zig says its not to be feared, the results can be good. Oh and the noiseware stuff works a treat and takes about 3 seconds

al


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Old May 20, 2010, 10:16 AM   #2
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Just have to say that I love your bird photos!
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Old May 20, 2010, 1:10 PM   #3
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I think so far I'm concluding that the raising the ISO is somewhat like lowering the pixel count.... THe result will be fine but you can't expect to crop so heavy. Also as Zig says its not to be feared, the results can be good. Oh and the noiseware stuff works a treat and takes about 3 seconds
Nice Bird Shots.

Try setting up your exposure compensation up a notch or 2
I worked for me in cloudy lighting

I also have the same findings. My E-520 with 70-300 lense shots at ISO 1600 look Fine
untill I Crop past 50 %

What Noise ware Stuff are you using ??

Thx
Fred..

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Old May 20, 2010, 1:51 PM   #4
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hi,
the noise stuff is called noiseware, its free and takes about 2 seconds honestly to de-noise a picture...overdo it tho and its gets soft so I pick "weak noise"
alex
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Old May 20, 2010, 2:49 PM   #5
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hi,
the noise stuff is called noiseware, its free and takes about 2 seconds honestly to de-noise a picture...overdo it tho and its gets soft so I pick "weak noise"
alex
That's the same software...and the same default setting...that I use.

I will sometimes even go one extra step as I have Noiseware as a Photoshop CS4 plugin, so after I run it I can go to EDIT, then FADE and can adjust from 0-100% the amount of the applied filter to retain. You just move the slider bar down the graph until you like the look and you're done.
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Old May 20, 2010, 5:51 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alexs View Post
Following the recent very informative post on high iso I thought I'd share my experience...
Basically I started off trying iso 1600 on my e-520... weirdly I got 99% grainy rubbish except this one, and I think a couple of others. I've no real idea why except perhaps that it didn't need to be cropped (or very little) and the subject was nice and close. I'm thinking that "might" be the secret to iso 1600?? could well be wrong though...


Finally this singing robin was at iso-800 and about 12 feet away. I've no idea what the rule of thumb is here. 800 is sometimes ok? All of the ones i took at iso 800 I ran through the free noiseware software and set the filter to "weak noise". Don't really know what I'm doing withh it but the result is ok...

I think so far I'm concluding that the raising the ISO is somewhat like lowering the pixel count.... THe result will be fine but you can't expect to crop so heavy. Also as Zig says its not to be feared, the results can be good. Oh and the noiseware stuff works a treat and takes about 3 seconds

al
Hi Alexs and welcome to the Oly forum. It is really great to see so many new forum members starting to post and joining in on the conversations.


As for some possible answers to your questions; Since I've not seen the rubbish images, it's hard to say what went wrong. But, this is what I've come to know about the 70-300mm.
If you want to get sharp image of small songbirds showing good to sharp feather detail, getting as close as possible is the key. When I say close, it's less than 10ft. Large birds Eagles, Osprey, and such - due to their size , are easier to photograph from a greater distance. If you can get as close as 5 ft, this one change alone will dramatically increase your keeper rate.

The 70-300mm does seem to provide the best output at f8. especially, as you go further away from the subject. By the way, if you do manage to get really close to your subject, then you really do want f8 as a starting point because now, your problem becomes depth of field. You'll find your d-o-f will become very thin. This is probably, for me, the biggest reason I use
high ISO settings. I'm usually 3 to 4ft away from the subject. I hate to crop as it deteriorates the image quickly, So, instead, I have my aperture at f8 or higher set the shutter speed to 1/250sec. (on a tripod) as a minimum, then dial in the ISO that will give me the proper exposure.

These settings are usually used when I'm shooting birds which is normally just after daybreak. It becomes easier as the day goes on. But, then, the birds see you a whole lot better and don't get as close.

Sorry for the long winded welcome.

And, by the way, if lighting -or lack of it is a problem, then you really should consider a 50-200mm SWD. Much faster, sharper, and has a more accurate focus system.

Zig
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Old May 20, 2010, 7:43 PM   #7
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The photos you've posted look great.

As for high ISO, it is critical not to under expose the pic. Any brightening will bring noise with it. Normally I shoot at -.3 ev compensation to keep highlights recoverable. When shooting at high ISO, I will eithe be 0 or +.3 ev because the dark areas will tend to be more of a problem than blowing the whites.

A little fill flash may go a long ways too.

Greg
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