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Old Oct 30, 2010, 3:01 AM   #1
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Default The Pythons

Some would suggest I may have a anthropomorphic approach to reptiles, or that I may end up on a sensationalist news show because one of my collection got the best of me....let me assure you, neither is true. I take these animals very seriously and know they are capable of causing serious injury. I have been keeping and studying reptiles since a very young age, they have my respect.

now, onto some pics! All shots were taken in natural light using the Olympus E-3 and ZD 14-54mm MK 1 lens

This is my yearling Biak Island Locale Green Tree Python, it is going through it's ontogenetic color change and will eventually be mostly green in color.





This is my hatchling Aru Island Locale Green Tree Python, it is about half the size of the other one at around 14-16"





These are Australian Carpet Pythons, they come in many different varieties and some are more sought after than others. This is a 1.1 pair, in other words one is male and the other is female. The male is a Jungle Jaguar Carpet Python and the female is it's sibling, but only carries the Jungle genetics, when they mate I should get a 50/50 mixture of both.

this is the male, he is a uncooperative photo subject





this is the female, she is much calmer





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Old Oct 30, 2010, 6:38 AM   #2
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As before, excellent images. Spot-on lighting and composition, and really interesting (but then again, I've always liked snakes).

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I take these animals very seriously and know they are capable of causing serious injury.
I'm sure this sounds naive, but why would your non-venomous snakes be that dangerous? Are some of them so large that they can give you a serious bite? I do know that it's possible to get seriously ill from the bacteria in the saliva if they bite you but I just assumed that antibiotics handle that well, nowadays.

Ted
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Old Oct 30, 2010, 1:32 PM   #3
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As before, excellent images. Spot-on lighting and composition, and really interesting (but then again, I've always liked snakes).



I'm sure this sounds naive, but why would your non-venomous snakes be that dangerous? Are some of them so large that they can give you a serious bite? I do know that it's possible to get seriously ill from the bacteria in the saliva if they bite you but I just assumed that antibiotics handle that well, nowadays.

Ted
Carpet Pythons can get to 8-9 feet and Green Tree Pythons can reach 7 feet, imagine 7-9 feet of solid muscle constricting around your neck or head.... a bite from an aboreal snake is no joke either. Their teeth are rather long so that they can penetrate the fur/feather layer of tree dwelling mammals and birds much like a Northern Pike or Muskie...

this is a pic from a small adult

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Old Oct 30, 2010, 1:41 PM   #4
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As usual, stunning shots. However, I'm glad I'm not in the same room with them!
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Old Oct 30, 2010, 1:46 PM   #5
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......................................
I'm sure this sounds naive, but why would your non-venomous snakes be that dangerous? Are some of them so large that they can give you a serious bite? I do know that it's possible to get seriously ill from the bacteria in the saliva if they bite you but I just assumed that antibiotics handle that well, nowadays.

Ted
Ted, there was a young child killed in Florida last year by a python. Unlike Edge, it was being kept by an idiot, who didn't feed it enough. The hungry snake got out of it's cage, and went to the child's crib. It was hungry, and acting on instinct, the warm body was just food. The child suffocated before the parents got the snake off.
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Old Oct 30, 2010, 1:48 PM   #6
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Well y'all answered my question - are there adult pythons who are able to take on humans. Oy!

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