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Old Dec 1, 2010, 11:48 PM   #11
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But please be careful of Wizzard here - that Cat loves birds and now we find that he loves fish. Big surprise - neither is likely to be a healthy outcome for the subjects of the photos.

Ted


What fish...?

I don't see no fish...
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Old Dec 2, 2010, 12:34 AM   #12
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Great shots....But that Yellow Tang has that disapproving look Miss Hodgins, my first school teacher had!!!

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Last edited by Scouse; Dec 2, 2010 at 12:50 AM.
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Old Dec 2, 2010, 8:03 AM   #13
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The eyes being in focus are important 99% of the time, but having the rest of the subject gently fall out of focus is a common, and often appealing technique. Having everything in the image tack sharp can lead to a very busy and cluttered composition. Why do you think photographers pay big bucks for fast lenses? For just this reason.
Good morning Diver Dave and welcome to the Oly forum, here at Steve's.

As for Sarah's capture of the Yellow Tang, I mentioned that I thought it was indeed a great shot. My eyes just would have preferred to see the Tang completely in focus. So, I suggested that. The key word here is suggested.

The beauty of photography is that everyone sees life through a different prism. What you or I may like may be totally different. When someone posts a shot on this Forum, I'm sure they are looking for acknowledgement on a job well done. I also would like to think that they might like to get a suggestion or two.

And, I'll be the first to say that not all my suggestions are met with agreement from the rest of the Forum members. And, in this instance, by you as well. But that's what makes this Forum enjoyable

I do hope you get a chance to post a few of your photos.

So, that's why people buy those expensive fast lenses.....hmmm, and I thought all along it was to impress their friends.

By the way, I wanted to add that I took a look at your photos on Smugmug.com. Very beautiful captures of fish, we on the East Coast, just don't get an opportunity to see.
Just lovely.

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Last edited by zig-123; Dec 2, 2010 at 9:05 AM.
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Old Dec 2, 2010, 1:44 PM   #14
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Hi everyone, thank you for the comments!

They are indeed Marine Fish, i have a large Marine aquarium and a smaller one too

The camera is the Oly E-450 and the lens is just one that came with it, a rather boring 14-42mm

I'm completely now to DSLR cameras, this is my first one and i've had it only a week.

I still have no idea how to use it right now, so i wouldn't have a clue how to change the setting to produce clearer depth to the pictures, i am currently hunting down some good lens's and a flash so i can really begin to experiment.

But for now i'm afraid my pictures won't be amazing

It also doesn't help that photographing pet fish means taking pictures through glass which can be tricky due to flash etc and also if the glass is dirty or marked...








Last edited by x Sarah x; Dec 2, 2010 at 1:51 PM.
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Old Dec 2, 2010, 2:07 PM   #15
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Well, you're doing a pretty good job, Sarah...!

To get more Depth of Field (DOF) use a smaller aperture (larger f number)...

Here's a nice interactive site that lets you play with aperture, shutter and ISO
settings to see what they do... Click the box that says, "link aperture/shutter"
and then move the aperture slider back and forth to see what different apertures
do regarding DOF...

http://www.kamerasimulator.se/eng/?page_id=2

Here's another good site with a tutorial about DOF...

http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...h-of-field.htm

Hope something here helps and keep up the good work...!
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Old Dec 2, 2010, 2:58 PM   #16
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Sarah commented:

The camera is the Oly E-450 and the lens is just one that came with it, a rather boring 14-42mm

I'm completely now to DSLR cameras, this is my first one and i've had it only a week.

I still have no idea how to use it right now, so i wouldn't have a clue how to change the setting to produce clearer depth to the pictures, i am currently hunting down some good lens's and a flash so i can really begin to experiment.

But for now i'm afraid my pictures won't be amazing

It also doesn't help that photographing pet fish means taking pictures through glass which can be tricky due to flash etc and also if the glass is dirty or marked...



Hi,

And, for someone who has had the camera for a week, you're doing great, as your images are very enjoyable to view. As for the boring 14-42mm kit lens, well, as I said, the images here are quite good. Not bad, for a throw in kit lens.

As for better understanding your camera and all the settings, etc. there are a myriad of tutorials out there. Using google to find tutorials on specific topics is a great way to learn. Olympus also has a learning section on their website.
Since it's geared towards the Olympus user, you'll find it very pertinent.

www.olympusamerica.com/

Personally, I found Scott Kelby's books on Digital Photography book1 ,2 and 3
very useful as they deal with specific situations and how to get the best shot.
The books are especially handy since they come in paperback, they are small and you can take them with you whenever you go out into the field.

P.S., they make a great Xmas gift.

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Old Dec 2, 2010, 3:01 PM   #17
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Thank you! I did wonder what the big F was for
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Old Dec 2, 2010, 4:03 PM   #18
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....I agree, these are really good images and I do like the Blue Tang, the surgeon. You've a very nice collection and I for one am anxious to see many more of your excellent aquarium photographs.

For the beginning I would suggest you find limits with the 14-42 which is a quite good lens for what you are doing presently, learn the camera and after a while you will begin to understand more of what lens may do more of what you've headed into.

In the mean time please continue posting with images and questions.
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Old Dec 2, 2010, 4:20 PM   #19
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Hi everyone, thank you for the comments!
Sarah, you have chosen one of the more difficult areas of photography. You're shooting through thick glass with lighting from above (if it's typical aquarium lighting), with a decent but not professional-level camera and lens.

Given all that, your photos are darned good and I'm really enjoyng them. The advice you're getting is good but don't let that stop you from feeling satisfaction with the photos you've already taken. I never got pix that good, years ago, with a film camera and the aquarium I had back then. You've got the inside surface of the glass pretty clean which is no easy task, and the outside surface clean.

You go girl!!!!!

Ted

Last edited by tkurkowski; Dec 2, 2010 at 4:29 PM.
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Old Dec 2, 2010, 11:03 PM   #20
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Thank you very much

Photographing fish isn't what i got the cam for, i keep many pets uncluding rodents, lizards, snakes, tarantulas, centipedes and my pup and i love photographing them all!

That is the main reason i'm getting a macro lens first chance i can so that i can capture the detail of the spiders and baby snakes

But i do enjoy snapping the fish too, as you say its difficult to keep the glass clean and i hadn't even bothered cleaning it before i took those pics!

I have hundreds upon hundreds of pictures of the animals, but taken with smaller point and shoot cameras so nothing for this section as of yet except the very few i've taken so far whilst trying to get used to the camera!

I shall keep posting on my journey into the world of DSLR's though
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