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Old Dec 7, 2010, 7:40 AM   #1
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Default A day that will live in infamy

That's what President Roosevelt called December 7th, 1941. The day the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. An attack that forever changed the world.

I guess I'm getting too old as I was looking at my regular on line newspaper sites this morning to read articles remembering that day. And reminding us to take a minute out of our busy lives to remember those who gave their lives so that we can be free.

I have yet to find one.
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Old Dec 7, 2010, 7:44 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zig-123 View Post
That's what President Roosevelt called December 7th, 1941. The day the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. An attack that forever changed the world.

I guess I'm getting too old as I was looking at my regular on line newspaper sites this morning to read articles remembering that day. And reminding us to take a minute out of our busy lives to remember those who gave their lives so that we can be free.

I have yet to find one.
Amen, Zig. The REALLY sad part is many have already forgotten 9/11! People have changed, buddy.
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Old Dec 7, 2010, 10:40 AM   #3
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Zig: In a way I understand what you're saying. But I also look at it like this:
Those that lost their lives at Pearl Harbor are no different than those that lost their lives in any other place / time in the service of their country. That is why we honor them on Memorial Day. And while the historical lessons of WWII are important those lessons go beyond Dec 7 (actions/inactions leading up to Dec 7, our treatment of Japanese Americans, Holocaust, national support, the list is endless). If there's day's on the calendar people should note they should be the triumphs associated with the defeat of Germany in Europe and Japan in the Pacific. Not necessarily the day we were attacked. The loss of life was tragic, but no more tragic than any other battle big or small.

I think that's the difference as time passes - the event was ingrained on the psyche of those who were alive and old enough to understand at the time because it was so unprecedented. But I guess after reading the Book: We Were Soldiers Once, And Young my attitude changed a bit. The stories relayed in that book have taken place thousands of times in one shape or another across a thousand battlefields. And those soldiers are due no less honor than those who died at Pearl Harbor.

And, of course, hats off to everyone who served - in whatever capacity in whatever time of war or peace. I and many others are grateful for your service.
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Old Dec 7, 2010, 10:56 AM   #4
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Hi John,

Everything you say is true. (and, I am showing my age here).

I guess the one distinction I'll make is this, in my mind, it was the first time this Country was attacked on it's own soil. Also, the men and women who gave their lives that day didn't have a clue as to what was about to happen since we were not at war.

In retrospect, I should have done this on Facebook. This is after all, a forum about photography and equipment, so I probably shouldn't have aired my disappointment here.

Zig
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Old Dec 7, 2010, 1:14 PM   #5
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Zig, I agree with you. An extremely important day from a history standpoint, a day that literally changed the world. Next they will want us to forget 9/11.
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Old Dec 7, 2010, 6:36 PM   #6
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Default History International has a program about it

at 7pm EST today
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Old Dec 8, 2010, 11:50 AM   #7
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The sad thing about history is, apart from those who live through it and history nut-types like me who love to read and watch everything about it they can find on The History Channel, after a long enough period of time no one remembers it and people insane enough to not learn from it or know better repeat it.

Not that many years ago I remember a story I read about how, during a major renovation at the White House that included removing decades upon decades of painting and re-painting, they hit on a part of America History I imagine few think about anymore that involved an attack on American soil that far pre-dated the attack at Pearl Harbor and the last of those who lived through it died well over 100 years ago..

http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/washingtonsack.htm

The burns marks on the White House were/are still there. I imagine 125 years from now about as many people will remember Pearl Harbor as a single event as those today who remember (much less even know about) the War of 1812.

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Old Dec 8, 2010, 3:05 PM   #8
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Remember Pearl Harbor -- Keep America Alert!

(Now deceased) America's oldest living Medal of Honor recipient, living his 101st year is former enlisted Chief Petty Officer, Aviation Chief Ordnanceman (ACOM), later wartime commissioned Lieutenant John W. Finn, U. S. Navy (Ret.). He is also the last surviving Medal of Honor, "The Day of Infamy", Japanese Attack on the Hawaiian Islands, Naval Air Station, Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Territory of Hawaii, 7 December 1941.

(Now deceased) 'Navy Centenarian Sailor', 103 year old, former enlisted Chief Petty Officer, Aviation Chief Radioman (ACRM, Combat Aircrewman), later wartime commissioned Chief Warrant Officer Julio 'Jay' Ereneta, U. S. Navy (Ret.), is a thirty year career veteran of World War One and World War Two. He first flew aircrewman in August 1922; flew rearseat Radioman/Gunner (1920s/1930s) in the tactical air squadrons of the Navy's first aircraft carriers, USS LANGLEY (CV-1) and USS LEXINGTON (CV-2).

Visit my photo album tribute to these centenarian veteran shipmates and other Pearl Harbor survivors:

http://news.webshots.com/album/123286873BFAAiq

http://news.webshots.com/album/141695570BONFYl

San Diego, California
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