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Old Jan 6, 2011, 10:00 AM   #1
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Default Why I moved back to Florida

With all the weather news, like the snow that is still piled up in NYC, continues to validate again and again why Sharon and I decided to move back to Florida. (Yes, I know I'm a wimp in cold weather.)

I was organizing some old shots recently from January 2005. Let me show everyone some of the things that finalized that decision back in early 2005:



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Old Jan 6, 2011, 10:02 AM   #2
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Last edited by Steven R; Jan 6, 2011 at 12:29 PM.
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Old Jan 6, 2011, 12:14 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Steven R View Post
With all the weather news, like the snow that is still piled up in NYC, continues to validate again and again why Sharon and I decided to move back to Florida. (Yes, I know I'm a wimp in cold weather.)

I was organizing some old shots recently from January 2005. Let me show everyone some of the things that finalized that decision back in early 2005:

All I'm seeing is plain black. If that caused you to move, yes you are a wimp!

Ted
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Old Jan 6, 2011, 12:29 PM   #4
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Are you sure all you are seeing is black??
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Old Jan 6, 2011, 2:39 PM   #5
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Are you sure all you are seeing is black??
At 12:14 yes - there were no images attached. But I'm busy so just ignore my post - I don't have time to argue.
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Old Jan 8, 2011, 3:33 PM   #6
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On days like this I could join you Steven.
Calgary this afternoon
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Old Jan 8, 2011, 11:09 PM   #7
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On days like this I could join you Steven.
Calgary this afternoon
Hi Fred: button up and stay warm!!

I've lived in some of the cold states, and remember some of those cold winters. I can certainly empathize with you guys.

(You do have an advantage in being able to get some great snow and ice photos.)
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Old Jan 9, 2011, 8:20 AM   #8
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Default Mother Nature can warm y'all up

She did it near Flagstaff:



This is the Sunset Crater volcano. This eruption occured around 1100 AD, which on a geologic time scale was maybe 5 seconds ago.

But regarding Steven's topic, around here we'll be lucky if the high goes up to the freezing point of water, so I'm planning to sit by the fireplace today.

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Old Jan 9, 2011, 9:23 AM   #9
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BTW, on an overall scale that Sunset Crater volcano was just a minor burp. Even Mount St. Helens (at under 10K feet) was kinda wimpy compared to this volcano:



You're looking at the settting of Flagstaff, which sits beyond the foreground trees at the base of a giant caldera. The highest peak, at 12,633 feet, is Humphrey's Peak on the left above. But if you imagine extending the curves of the peaks you see here, up to the peak of the original mountain before the volcanic eruption, geologists estimate that it was a 14K peak.

And even that one is small compared to whatever happened at what is called the Yellowstone Supervolcano. The Yellowstone caldera itself measures 34 x 45 miles (just a bit larger than what you see above ).

Are you warm yet?

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Old Jan 9, 2011, 2:27 PM   #10
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Don't know what all the fuss is about, Sharon (Mine) and I are enjoying our winter weather...............
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