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Old Apr 5, 2011, 4:47 AM   #1
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Default [pics] Sulphur-crested Cockatoo Kings!

While wandering around Braeside Park, I heard in the distance a very noisy flock of Sulphur-crested Cockatoos. I made my way towards the flock to find several in the group engaged in very peculiar behaviour. The cockatoos appeared to be either putting on some sort of display in what I think was an attempt to stake a claim on particular nesting hollows. The cockatoos were very loud & animated; screeching loudly, crests raised, wings flapping about it was quite a sight to behold.

September 3rd, 2010
Braeside Park, Braeside, Victoria, Australia
Olympus E620
Zuiko 50-200mm SWD lens
EC14 Teleconverter

http://pixelatedempire.com/2011/02/s...d-cockatoos-4/





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Old Apr 5, 2011, 8:26 AM   #2
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LOL It's a shot of that rare plant species, the Flowering Cockatoo Tree!!

Well done Adam.
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Old Apr 5, 2011, 1:18 PM   #3
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LOL! It's funny - the ones we have in our rescue aviary are pretty laid back. But I guess they, like the other rescued parrots we have (mostly macaws), are really happy to have a home.



This is the flight cage. The indoor aviary where they sleep is the building, the edge of which is on the right.

Here are a couple of the macaws.



Ted

Last edited by tkurkowski; Apr 5, 2011 at 1:22 PM.
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Old Apr 9, 2011, 9:30 AM   #4
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I am INSANELY jealous of those birds, Ted. Awesome.
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Old Apr 9, 2011, 4:27 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by piXelatedEmpire View Post
I am INSANELY jealous of those birds, Ted. Awesome.
I appreciate your appreciation, Adam. But when we get them, they are incredibly neurotic because they are flock animals by nature. But each of them were: first separated from their mother, had their wings intentionally broken, stuffed into a plastic pipe, smuggled into the US, then sold and locked into a cage by an owner who wanted a (living) ornament and ignored them as living creatures.

It takes us a long time to get them to be semi-normal (they will never be really normal outside of their natural habitat). Rigdzin (the keeper you see there) spends a lot of time just loving them, and that brings them around. Many of the ones we get, have plucked out all their feathers, out of frustration.

The problem I'm describing is mostly with the (Brazilian) macaws. Fortunately Australia & the US have shut down the illegal Cockatoo import trade from Australia. Nevertheless, the Cockatoos born here are still treated as ornaments as I described above.

Many imported parrots have escaped from their confinement in the US and have established flocks in the US. The classic flocks are in San Francisco and on this forum Greg Chappel has documented flocks in the Dallas area.

Ted
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Old Apr 9, 2011, 8:10 PM   #6
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Hey Adam

That second shot is just great .. as if they all assumed the right position and pose for the shot. The pics look lsightly underexposed but spot on none the less.

Ted, thanks for the info the birds themselves.... always good to know that kind of info.

Cheers

Harj

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