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Old Jun 12, 2011, 9:41 AM   #1
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My dad's model 1957 Chevy. He had this on his office desk. His favorite car and it was the year he and mom married. Now, it's in my office.

I shot these handheld with the E5 and 50mm f2, at f2 and varying ISO's as high as 1600. One things' for sure after shooting these. I'm going to dust it first thing this next week,,,













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Old Jun 12, 2011, 12:05 PM   #2
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Greg: well done, interesting angles on a classic car; one of my favorite cars. I never thought about shooting car models, you got much more interesting shots than I can get at an auto show.
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Old Jun 13, 2011, 5:49 AM   #3
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Really nice, Greg. Did your dad own the real one also?
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Old Jun 13, 2011, 8:57 AM   #4
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According to mom he did once, long ago. The only two classics he owned that I was old enough to remember was a 1950 Ford that he re-conditioned to like-new and showed for a while before selling, and an incredible black El-Camino SS that I REALLY wanted as a teenager, but he told me it was too much vehicle for me....
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Old Jun 13, 2011, 10:49 AM   #5
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Very interesting shots! #4 is my fav.
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Old Jun 13, 2011, 11:43 AM   #6
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Quote:
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an incredible black El-Camino SS that I REALLY wanted as a teenager, but he told me it was too much vehicle for me....
He might have been right. In the late '60s my dad had a Pontiac Catalina that was a rocket in a straight line, but with the drum brakes, suspensions, and bias-ply tires of those days it was real easy for this teenager to get into trouble. I'm lucky to be alive, actually.

Ted

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Old Jun 13, 2011, 12:51 PM   #7
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Truth be told, that 1950 Ford was cool, but it was a standard transmission, which I could not drive back then or today, with the stick on the column, and it had a "flathead" 6 cyllindar (I think) engine that was little more than just the engine block. It was the simplest-looking automobile engine (post 1950 or so) I've ever seen, and was super quiet running, which would have been the last thing I would have wanted in 1978.
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Old Jun 13, 2011, 3:34 PM   #8
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I had meant to say that that model is really great - a lot of detail. My father's older brother had a 57 chevy which I don't remember all that well except that it was a wagon. Even back then I think I understood the concept of an automobile that wasn't ever going to be a chick magnet.
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Old Jun 13, 2011, 3:43 PM   #9
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Franklin mint. It is pretty darn detailed. Quite heavy, too. The tires are real rubber tires, the metal used on the body sure feels like the real deal. Even the seats look and feel "real". The top even comes up, assuming I could figure that out.
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Old Jun 13, 2011, 4:55 PM   #10
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Franklin mint. It is pretty darn detailed. Quite heavy, too. The tires are real rubber tires, the metal used on the body sure feels like the real deal. Even the seats look and feel "real". The top even comes up, assuming I could figure that out.
Which I should have guessed, and which is why you want to stay well away from Franklin Mint stuff. You think DSLR stuff is expensive?
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