Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Olympus dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Oct 22, 2011, 1:59 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Scouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Camano Island, WA.
Posts: 2,328
Default

Excellent photos and history Ted. I lived near the site of the very first railway where Stevensons Rocket a relative of your John Bull ran.

Next time you steamgearheads get to Engerland, take a trip to the mediaval town of York and visit the National Railway Museum there. The town itself has a wall around it and the Cathederal has some of the oldest glass in Europe. Fascinating narrow walkways where you could imagine the shouts of Guardyloo in the mornings as they emptied their chamberpots out of the windows.
The Museum is excellent though and well worth the trip for itself. Engines like the Duchess of Hamilton here in red and the Mallard in blue, which I believe still hold the worlds speed record. 125.88 MPH for steam engines.


Take your camera....
__________________
Ken.
"You are who you pretend to be."
Kurt Vonnegut Jnr.

Last edited by Scouse; Oct 22, 2011 at 2:03 PM.
Scouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 22, 2011, 4:39 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
tkurkowski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 3,625
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by boBBrennan View Post
.....I enjoy the locomotive photos very much. My hometown (Moberly, MIssouri) was a Wabash (steam) shops town for many years, I once saw the roundtable working, when I was 10-yrs. One of my fondest memories, riding a Saturday night 'mail run' from Shenandoah, IA to Moberly to visit my grandmother. I did that often when I was in high school 1955, the ticket was $2.00, the mileage was 200-mile, the trip was 7- hrs (lots of stops but the ticket was cheap), one passenger car and I was usually the only one in it.
That must have been fun. The only long rail trip I've taken was from Flagstaff to Chicago to DC round trip, back in 2003. The first leg was great - beautiful scenery and the tracks, maintained by BNSF, were good. But the tracks from Chicago to DC were in rough shape so the cars kept swaying from side to side the whole time. It was a version of the proverbial Chinese water torture.

I'd really like to take the Chicago to San Francisco route across the Rockies, or even better the Canadian route across the Canadian Rockies. Someday...

Ted
tkurkowski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 22, 2011, 4:43 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
tkurkowski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 3,625
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scouse View Post
Excellent photos and history Ted. I lived near the site of the very first railway where Stevensons Rocket a relative of your John Bull ran.

Next time you steamgearheads get to Engerland, take a trip to the mediaval town of York and visit the National Railway Museum there.
I'd love to do that. I've always liked British steam locomotives - they added style to their designs. US locomotives tended to be much more utiliitarian.
tkurkowski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 23, 2011, 12:51 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 133
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tkurkowski View Post
I didn't know fireless locomotives were made before I saw that one in Strassburg. I'm still wondering how they filled the reservoir - high pressure steam is really dangerous. It is invisible - the white cloud we think of as steam is the condensed water vapor which can be some distance from the source of the steam. When I was in the Navy I was taught that if the crew of the steam plant in a warship suspected a steam leak they would walk holding a broom at the broom end, waving the long handle in front of themselves. When the handle was sliced in two they had found the leak.

Ted
I haven't seen the process myself, but I guess they have an effective coupler for the hookup. I'll have to look more closely at it when we visit again.
As for the "steam" issue, I'm not O.C.D. or anything, but I do cringe a little when I see folks, even professionals, refer to water vapor as steam. Real steam is dry, and as you mentioned, not something to be trifled with.

I'd like to tinker with alternative energies, generators and the like, and steam is a technology which can be fed with a wide variety of fuels, so I really would like to try to build at least a small steam engine. Might be a while, though.
spacer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 23, 2011, 7:21 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
Bob Nichol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Eastern Ontario Canada
Posts: 822
Default

Exporail in suburban Montreal http://www.exporail.org has CPR 2850 the Royal Hudson that pulled the royal train of 1939 among other CPR and CNR locomotives.
Bob Nichol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 23, 2011, 12:42 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
tkurkowski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 3,625
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Nichol View Post
Exporail in suburban Montreal http://www.exporail.org has CPR 2850 the Royal Hudson that pulled the royal train of 1939 among other CPR and CNR locomotives.
Bob, from the web site it does look like a good rail museum.

Ted
tkurkowski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 23, 2011, 12:51 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
tkurkowski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 3,625
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by spacer View Post
I haven't seen the process myself, but I guess they have an effective coupler for the hookup. I'll have to look more closely at it when we visit again.
I'd be very interested in how they did that. I didn't see any information on the Internet but it sure wasn't like pumping gasoline into a car.

Quote:
Originally Posted by spacer View Post
...I really would like to try to build at least a small steam engine. Might be a while, though.
Garrett Wade is a company that sells very good tools including many hard to find ones. They also sell some miniature steam engine kits such as a steam powered farm tractor that's 11" long. Those German kits aren't cheap but are a lot less expensive than a full size steam engine and no more expensive than a well made HO-gauge locomotive. Look them up on their web site - you might find that to be fun.

Ted
tkurkowski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 25, 2011, 11:11 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,066
Default

I took this photo some time ago, it looks like some sort of 'Pirates of the Caribbean' kind of locomotive.
Typically in this period our trains followed the pattern of British trains. E5 7-14


Last edited by Rriley; Oct 25, 2011 at 11:15 AM.
Rriley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 25, 2011, 3:47 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Australia, New South Wales central coast
Posts: 2,891
Default

G'day TK + others

Many thanks for this great display of a bygone era
The museums you show here seem wonderful places to visit & meander around & your images show "what used to be" in great detail ... thanks

Regards, Phil
__________________
Has Fuji & Lumix superzoom cameras and loves their amazing capabilities
Spends 8-9 months each year travelling Australia
Recent images at http://www.flickr.com/photos/ozzie_traveller/sets/
Ozzie_Traveller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 25, 2011, 7:37 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
tkurkowski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 3,625
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rriley View Post
I took this photo some time ago, it looks like some sort of 'Pirates of the Caribbean' kind of locomotive.
Typically in this period our trains followed the pattern of British trains. E5 7-14
Very interesting. It has the stylish cab typical of British designs, but no weather protection for the crew so the Aussies are apparently saying they're manly men, a view that the crew probably didn't find comforting.

It was designed for hauling freight. The drive wheels are smaller for max torque for heavy loads. Passenger locomotives had much larger drive wheels to achieve maximum top speed with lighter loads. (Basically the same principles used for choosing the gear ratio for the final drive axle differential in automobiles.)

Ted
tkurkowski is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 6:59 AM.