Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Olympus dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Oct 13, 2011, 7:51 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
tkurkowski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 3,625
Default More Locomotives for Gearheads

These photos are from the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania, which houses a collection of over 100 locomotives and cars from the mid-19th and 20th centuries, including the priceless Pennsylvania Railroad Historical Collection. It's across the street from the Strassburg Railroad.

The John Bull:



The John Bull was one of the earliest steam locomotives used in the US. (The first steam locomotive in the US, which also was the first designed and built in the US, was the B&O's Tom Thumb in 1829.) The original John Bull (not the one in this photo) was built in England by Robert Stephenson in 1831, then shipped to the US. It began regular service in 1833 and was retired in 1866. In 1885 the Smithsonian Institution purchased it and it is on display in the National Museum of American History.

In 1981 the Smithsonian was planning the locomotive's 150th birthday. It had no noticeable deterioration so they had the intuition that it might still work. They asked the Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Company to determine if it was operable (you want to be careful with pressurized steam), and they determined that it would be safe at a boiler pressure of 50 psi (reduced from the original 70 psi). The Smithsonian tested it and then ran it on a branch track in the Washington DC area, which then made it the oldest operable steam locomotive in the world.

The Pennsylvania Railroad build an exact replica of it in 1939 and that's what you see here. This replica is also operable.

Pennsylvania RR #1223, a Juniata 4-4-0:



I had an interesting conversation with this locomotive.

Me: You were built in 1905 - weren't the 4-4-0s becoming obsolete at that point?
#1223: Obsolete? Obsolete? Obsolete my
Me (interrupting): careful with your language - this is a family forum.
#1223: OK - obsolete my posterior. I've run hard and pulled trains longer than almost any other steam locomotive. Eventually I pulled excursion trains for the Strassburg railroad across the street, throughout the 1970s and 1980s. I was retired in 1989 when ultrasound testing showed that my firebox wall thicknesses did not meet the latest regulations from those bureaucrats at the Federal Railroad Administration. Find me another locomotive that can beat that!
Me: Well I don't know about that but you sure do look mighty good, all shined up like you are here.
#1223: You bet your, your, um, posterior I do!

Pennsylvania RR #3937, a Juniata DD-1, built in 1911:



One of the earliest electric locomotives, #1937 is a DD-1 which is a third rail direct current electric locomotive. These were built for the electrification of railroads in the New York area, had a top speed of 85 mph, and were very reliable.

Note that the running gear was very similar in concept to steam locomotives - see the next photo:



To me it's interesting that the running gear of the first electric locomotives were an evolution of the steam locomotives, just with an electric motor replacing all the steam generation equipment. (Image from the 1922 Locomotive Cyclopedia of American Practice which is now in the public domain.)

Pennsylvania RR #4935, an Altoona GG-1, built in 1943:



The GG-1 was designed by General Electric using AC current from overhead wires. This class of electric locomotive was first operated in 1935, and hauled passenger cars at 100 mph (160 km/h). The styling of the prototype body shell is attributed to Westinghouse industrial designer Donald Roscoe Dohner and became an early popular symbol of a streamlined locomotive.

Two Penn Central GG1 locomotives pulled Robert F. Kennedy's funeral train on June 8, 1968.

Baldwin Locomotive Works #1200, a Baldwin S-12, built in 1951:



This photo is here because I didn't know that the Baldwin Locomotive Works, one of the major builders of steam locomotives in the US, also built diesel-electric locomotives. In fact it turns out they didn't last long in that market. Their small switcher diesel-electric locomotives (like the one here) were well regarded but they weren't able to produce a reliable prime mover. They stopped locomotive production in 1956.

Pennsylvania RR #860, a Budd Metroliner, built in 1968:



The Budd Metroliner car was designed to form an "electric multiple unit" train for first-class, high-speed service on the Pennsylvania Railroad's route between New York City and Washington, DC. The Metroliner program was originally a partnership between the Pennsylvania Railroad and the US Department of Transportation. The first two test units were delivered in 1968 and achieved a top speed of 164 mph (264 km/h). This #860 was built in 1969 and thus was one of the first units in regular service. When Amtrak took over the service in 1971 these were still in use, so this unit is one of the original Amtrak electric locomotives.

Here is a close-up of the front of the car with the gear to pick up the electric power from overhead wires. I put this photo here because I was struck by the fact that if you forum members were on this train this would be the car I would find you in (especially Gary, considering that last food post of his).



Amtrak #603, a GE E60, built in 1976:



The General Electric-built E60 was the first new electric locomotive design built for Amtrak, a time when the private freight railroads stopped operating passenger trains. This much more powerful (6,000 hp) locomotive was designed exclusively for passenger service and meant to replace an aging fleet of electrics that Amtrak had inherited from freight railroads (like the Budd Metroliner above).

Apparently this is one of the only first generation Amtrak electric locomotives in existence - most of them have been scrapped.

Pennsylvania Power & Light #4094-D, a Heisler 0-8-0F, built in 1940:



OK, this is a quiz. What's unusual about this locomotive?

Ted

Last edited by tkurkowski; Oct 22, 2011 at 9:24 AM.
tkurkowski is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Oct 13, 2011, 7:58 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
bluenose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 470
Default

"OK, this is a quiz. What's unusual about this locomotive?"

No smokestack.

Regards
bluenose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 13, 2011, 8:06 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
tkurkowski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 3,625
Default

You get a gold star.

It is a "Fireless" type locomotive, often described as a giant thermos bottle. Fireless locomotives were used in industrial plants that had steam generating equipment for other purposes. They received and stored steam, and were able to run for a number of hours in switching duties.

The 4094-D is the largest fireless steam locomotive ever built and was originally built for the Hammermill Paper Company in Erie.

Ted
tkurkowski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 13, 2011, 8:16 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
gjtoth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Louisville, KY, USA
Posts: 6,938
Default

Dang, Ted! Another fine series of photos and narration. And, another shove to find something similar locally... on a MUCH smaller scale, of course. Thanks for sharing. I truly found it interesting. Especially, the dining car!
__________________
Gary ---- "The best camera is the one you have with you."
<><~~~~~~~~~~~
Pentax K-70 ~ Panasonic FZ1000
My Gallery

--
Hebrews 13:3
gjtoth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 13, 2011, 8:37 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Steven R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Tampa, Florida
Posts: 5,910
Default


Three thumbs up for this post Ted. Love it!!!!!
Steven R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 13, 2011, 8:58 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
bluenose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 470
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tkurkowski View Post
You get a gold star.

It is a "Fireless" type locomotive, often described as a giant thermos bottle. Fireless locomotives were used in industrial plants that had steam generating equipment for other purposes. They received and stored steam, and were able to run for a number of hours in switching duties.

The 4094-D is the largest fireless steam locomotive ever built and was originally built for the Hammermill Paper Company in Erie.

Ted
I'm the son of a railroader. My father started as a fireman on steam locomotives in the 1950's and retired as an engineer on diesels. It's nice to see a museum devoted to preserving the old engines and rolling stock.

Regards
bluenose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 13, 2011, 9:16 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
tkurkowski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 3,625
Default

There are quite a few in the US that preserve a large collection - the B&O in Baltimore and the Illinois Railroad museum are two that come to mind. My point is that there must be a Canadian Pacific railroad museum somewhere.

Ted

Edit: look here

http://www.railscanada.com/links/Railroad_Museums/

Search that web site for Ontario

Last edited by tkurkowski; Oct 14, 2011 at 7:14 AM.
tkurkowski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 21, 2011, 8:06 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
boBBrennan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Arlington, Texas USA
Posts: 3,567
Default

.....I enjoy the locomotive photos very much. My hometown (Moberly, MIssouri) was a Wabash (steam) shops town for many years, I once saw the roundtable working, when I was 10-yrs. One of my fondest memories, riding a Saturday night 'mail run' from Shenandoah, IA to Moberly to visit my grandmother. I did that often when I was in high school 1955, the ticket was $2.00, the mileage was 200-mile, the trip was 7- hrs (lots of stops but the ticket was cheap), one passenger car and I was usually the only one in it.
__________________
.
boBBrennan .. FB=> http://tinyurl.com/dxlwxfz

.......he likes Olympus, Apple MAC & SmugMug best of the choices; he likes that he has choices

boBBrennan.smugmug.com
boBBrennan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 22, 2011, 1:02 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 133
Default

There's an old thermos bottle at the Heart of Dixie R.R. museum in Calera, AL. I always thought that stubby little thing was about the coolest piece of machinery there.
Too bad they're still stuck with a diesel mule for their excursions so far. Their steam loco is still in parts, in the process of restoration.
spacer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 22, 2011, 9:23 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
tkurkowski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 3,625
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by spacer View Post
There's an old thermos bottle at the Heart of Dixie R.R. museum in Calera, AL. I always thought that stubby little thing was about the coolest piece of machinery there.
Too bad they're still stuck with a diesel mule for their excursions so far. Their steam loco is still in parts, in the process of restoration.
I didn't know fireless locomotives were made before I saw that one in Strassburg. I'm still wondering how they filled the reservoir - high pressure steam is really dangerous. It is invisible - the white cloud we think of as steam is the condensed water vapor which can be some distance from the source of the steam. When I was in the Navy I was taught that if the crew of the steam plant in a warship suspected a steam leak they would walk holding a broom at the broom end, waving the long handle in front of themselves. When the handle was sliced in two they had found the leak.

Ted
tkurkowski is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 7:02 AM.