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Old Jan 10, 2012, 11:37 PM   #11
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Wandering along the lake shore enjoying the advancing evening is one of my favorite stress reducers. One of the things I really like about photography is planning the angle of a shot. I must have taken 20 shots to finally get the one here. I really wanted to be very close to ground level and after trying various methods I finally got on the ground and lay on my midsection across a large (mostly!) flat rock with my camera resting on it's very end. Success! There were only two problems with this brilliant idea--I'm 66 and have crappy knees,hmm, awkward to get back up. Also, because the lake spent 8 weeks this past summer at about 14 feet over conservation level every rock, including the one I was stretched across, is covered with a coating of the dreaded zebra mussels. I had to brush a ton of them off my coat! But all in all, I had a lovely evening of photography, if just a bit cool!
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Old Jan 11, 2012, 4:15 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by spedangie View Post
Wandering along the lake shore enjoying the advancing evening is one of my favorite stress reducers. One of the things I really like about photography is planning the angle of a shot. I must have taken 20 shots to finally get the one here. I really wanted to be very close to ground level and after trying various methods I finally got on the ground and lay on my midsection across a large (mostly!) flat rock with my camera resting on it's very end. Success! There were only two problems with this brilliant idea--I'm 66 and have crappy knees,hmm, awkward to get back up. Also, because the lake spent 8 weeks this past summer at about 14 feet over conservation level every rock, including the one I was stretched across, is covered with a coating of the dreaded zebra mussels. I had to brush a ton of them off my coat! But all in all, I had a lovely evening of photography, if just a bit cool!
Hi Angie,

The pains and extreme's we photographers have to go through to get the perfect shot.

Seriously though, the last image is a result of your planning and thinking about what exactly it was that you wanted to capture and the results prove that. The image is worthy of being on display. Very well done.

Also, I'm not sure of which model camera you have but, often times in cases such as this I set my camera up on the tripod with the legs of the pod fully closed and then I spread them out as far as is possible so that the camera body is about 6" off the ground. The E-30 has the articulating screen which works wonderfully for shots like this as I use it to compose the image in live view.
Then, once I think I've got the framing where I want it. I get out of live view and take the shot. Using a remote trigger also helps in low light shots such as this.

At 62, I understand, only too well, how you feel.

Zig
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Old Jan 11, 2012, 7:50 PM   #13
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Zig--I didn't have my tripod with me--to get to the shoreline I had to trek down a grass and bush covered hill. I use a 'walking stick' to help my not so good knees manage all the uneven areas and that last little jump down to the rocky shore area. I didn't want to add the tripod to the mix going down the hill. I have at times (doing wildflowers and such) used a tripod pretty much as you described though. The area where I was Sunday evening is so full of rocks and very uneven so it is hard to get the tripod positioned correctly. So I sucked it up and got down low. I have an E620 so it does have the articulating screen which I have used at times as you described. I also have a remote cable trigger. Getting down is definitely easier than getting back up. Last winter I wanted to get that perfect angle doing some shots of a line of drifts along a fence line. I finally just waded down into the ditch and ended up literally sitting down in the snow to get what I wanted--woo hoo! BUT--now I had to figure out how to get out of the snow with nothing but more snow to push myself up. I didn't have my trusty walking stick to help, and I'm holding my camera with the (not cheap) 12-60 lens so I can't use one arm to help with the heaving myself up process. So here I am on a remote county road stuck sitting in a snow filled ditch. A real dilemma. It wasn't easy and certainly could not have looked attractive but somehow I did manage to get up and out without damaging myself or my camera. Definitely one of the downsides of getting older for me is that my knees are the pits these days--one has been replaced and the other is heading in that direction. A cortisone shot every six months is holding it in check right now, but sooner or later----
By the way, your lovely flower print is gracing my living room wall and I really hate having to confess that no, I can't take credit for its loveliness!
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Old Jan 11, 2012, 8:30 PM   #14
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Hi Angie,

Thanks. I have so many framed prints hanging on the various walls in our home that my wife has forbidden me to hang anymore. So, I'm glad to hear it has a home.

Your note reminds me that I have to start practicing up for an upcoming Flower Show. Each year, in January, the Cape Cod and Islands Orchid Growers have a show about 15minutes from my home. The last few years, they've allowed photographers to come in the day prior and take photographs. It's a wonderful opportunity to photograph rare and exotic Orchids without the crowds. Only caveat is that you absolutely cannot touch any of the orchids. Last year, I got
lucky and got a few really nice captures of orchids I'd never seen before.

Zig
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Old Jan 12, 2012, 8:42 AM   #15
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All of these shots are wonderful, very nice
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Old Jan 15, 2012, 4:07 PM   #16
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Wonderfull colors and very good pictures.
I also do love #3 the most.
Thank you for sharing.
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