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Old Mar 21, 2012, 9:38 PM   #1
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Default A cute couple.

E-3 and 50-200mm. ooc jpegs, no PP.










(You don't have to rescue these, Ted. They already are rescued and are living a pampered life in Busch Gardens.)
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Old Mar 22, 2012, 7:09 AM   #2
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(You don't have to rescue these, Ted. They already are rescued and are living a pampered life in Busch Gardens.)
Hah! That's good - we don't have any more room. Are they able to fly? Are there only 2 of them?

I enjoyed the photos - macaws are fascinating parrots. In their natural environment they are in flocks like most parrots, and at least one of them would be the alpha, watching you the intruder carefully, and squacking out warnings to the flock. Probably not what Busch Gardens has in mind.

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Old Mar 22, 2012, 9:15 PM   #3
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Colourful guys aren't they. Nice shots especially with the backlighting. Did the E3 compensate or did you?
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Old Mar 23, 2012, 11:15 AM   #4
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Colorful guys aren't they. Nice shots especially with the backlighting. Did the E3 compensate or did you?
Thanks Ken. I compensated the lazy man's way. I was in spot meter mode, and just metered on the darkest part of the scene and then held the half way press and re-composed before shooting. The E-3 spot meter seems to work pretty well in those situations.

Ted: In that whole big park, I have only seen 5. If they have more, I have not seen them. I don't think any of them can fly. 3 are Macaws, and they have a pair of big solid blue parrots that are really pretty, but I don't remember what kind they are.
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Old Mar 23, 2012, 12:07 PM   #5
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Thanks Ken. I compensated the lazy man's way. I was in spot meter mode, and just metered on the darkest part of the scene and then held the half way press and re-composed before shooting. The E-3 spot meter seems to work pretty well in those situations.

Ted: In that whole big park, I have only seen 5. If they have more, I have not seen them. I don't think any of them can fly. 3 are Macaws, and they have a pair of big solid blue parrots that are really pretty, but I don't remember what kind they are.
That's the way I do it for those shots, sometime have have to adjust a tad after I see the result.

Smart birds, They seem to have adapted to city parks all over the world. From San Francisco to Paris and Barcelona et al.
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Old Mar 27, 2012, 6:24 PM   #6
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Nice pictures Steve, I'm a bit late on your post.

@ Ken : These birds are not in the parks of Paris, I can assure you that.
They would die from the cold in the winter.

Here we only see those in bird shops.
At home we had a Blue forehead amazon, smaller bird then these.
He did get 23y old and it was a huge sadness when he passed away.
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Old Mar 27, 2012, 8:13 PM   #7
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Wow, definitely they are in love.

Nice picture Steven.
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Old Mar 28, 2012, 10:08 AM   #8
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At home we had a Blue forehead amazon, smaller bird then these.
He did get 23y old and it was a huge sadness when he passed away.
That's pretty young - normally in captivity those can live to 50 or older. That's part of the problem with larger parrots. Since they usually are acquired by people who are adults, they typically outlive their owners.

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Old Mar 28, 2012, 10:13 AM   #9
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Smart birds, They seem to have adapted to city parks all over the world. From San Francisco to Paris and Barcelona et al.
I don't think macaws have done that, presumably because their size (their bodies are at least as large as chickens) means they need to eat a lot and that's probably difficult to forage for in urban environments. But I've seen videos of macaws flying around in the wild in Brazil, and it's an amazing and beautiflu sight. If that happened in urban areas it would stop people in their tracks and be front-page news.
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