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Old Feb 24, 2014, 11:24 AM   #11
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Default And to move back towards being on-topic

I do recommend that if you have a computer than can support USB3 bus speeds, you should set that up. Downloading a RAW file to your computer over USB3 is way faster than USB2. If you don't have USB3 capability in your computer you can probably add a PCI Express board to your desktop computer and then get a USB3 card reader. If you have a laptop with an ExpressCard slot you can add a CF or SD Express card reader, or even a USB3 Express card to connect to an external USB3 card reader.

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Old Feb 24, 2014, 11:25 AM   #12
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Ted, are you saying that all my emails sent from my iPhone go into iCloud? And they are easily accessible by hackers??
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Old Feb 24, 2014, 11:30 AM   #13
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Ted, are you saying that all my emails sent from my iPhone go into iCloud?
Yes. Why would you think otherwise?

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And they are easily accessible by hackers??
Define "easily". For a medical insurance company that want to pay someone to get them in, that's not "easily" but my guess is yes, they can read it if they want to. Are they doing this now? Not as far as I know. Will they try it in the future? You're kidding, right?
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Old Feb 24, 2014, 11:44 AM   #14
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Just to be sure since you just said Cloud and not iCloud so I guess they are one and the same. I'll have to check out Cloud and see if there is a way not to store emails in there. I am not what you would call a geek.
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Yes. Why would you think otherwise?



Define "easily". For a medical insurance company that want to pay someone to get them in, that's not "easily" but my guess is yes, they can read it if they want to. Are they doing this now? Not as far as I know. Will they try it in the future? You're kidding, right?
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Old Feb 24, 2014, 12:12 PM   #15
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... I'm talking about something as simple as health insurance companies checking the risk level of your lifestyle as you (or your children and grandchildren) portray it on Facebook or Twitter (think about Steven or Ken here ) and adjusting your policy rates accordingly. That may not necessarily be a bad idea - they do it for smokers - but things can get pretty fuzzy when you go beyond a simple yes-or-no I smoke or not consideration.

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Encrypt it before storing it "in the cloud". ;-)

Of course, there's no guarantee that the encryption algorithms have not been compromised already, especially using massive computer processing power to help with the decryption process.

But, I'd probably just use something like dm-crypt under linux (using LUKS); or use something like TrueCrypt (available for multiple operating systems) if I were concerned about it. I've got some partitions using encryption, and some that don't. But, I'm in the process of setting up a newer PC now, and I may go ahead and encrypt all data that I save while I'm going through that process (as the CPU overhead isn't that great with newer processors), and make sure any data I store with cloud providers (Google Drive, Dropbox, etc.) has already been encrypted locally first.
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Old Feb 24, 2014, 1:13 PM   #16
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Can you run a Mac without Adobe software? If not, I think you're SOL on avoiding cloud apps.

So you want me to get my apps from the cloud and even worse, store my information there? Are you effing kidding? Frankly I think anyone who uses Gmail or Yahoo mail or any email system storing your messages in the cloud, will eventually regret it. And I'm not talking about NSA being able to read it - that's probably not preventable. I'm talking about something as simple as health insurance companies checking the risk level of your lifestyle as you (or your children and grandchildren) portray it on Facebook or Twitter (think about Steven or Ken here ) and adjusting your policy rates accordingly.

Ted
Ted that .. bit right there just says "BINGO". I don't trust any of the cloud providers period. We're kind of stuck with them though .. who do you switch to ? Also the likes of Google/yahoo and co don't make it easy to pull all your mail off their servers and then your still stuffed as theyre more than likely just archiving it all for years to come.

I don;t use the cloud at all .. if i can avoid it I will...
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Old Feb 24, 2014, 1:41 PM   #17
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The convenience of using cloud storage is just too tempting (at least to me) as an extra way to protect important data in the event of PC failure, theft, flood, fire, etc.; with prices dropping for cloud storage on a regular basis (more and more storage at a lower cost/GB).

But, yes, the privacy aspect of storing data in the cloud is disturbing, unless you're making sure that data is encrypted locally first (versus relying on the cloud storage providers to handle protection of your data; and given the numerous data theft and compromises we read about in the news all the time, I wouldn't trust that my private data is safe from prying eyes, without encrypting it locally first)
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Old Feb 24, 2014, 2:10 PM   #18
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Just to be sure since you just said Cloud and not iCloud so I guess they are one and the same. I'll have to check out Cloud and see if there is a way not to store emails in there. I am not what you would call a geek.
"Cloud" means your data is stored on servers connected to the internet (the "cloud"), along with everybody else's data. But originally, private email services like Earthlink accepted email to you and stored it on their servers, only long enough for you to transfer it to your own hard drive.

At that point your email on their servers was transferred to backup servers and wasn't easily accessible to hackers. But it wasn't accessible to you on the internet either - you had to go to your hard drive to read the email. So some companies started to sell a different service - your email always remains on their servers (until you delete it) and you can read it from any computer that has an internet connection. Google's Gmail wasn't the first such service (I think yahoo mail was way earlier) but probably was the one to make cloud email storage grow the fastest. Google makes this easy for people because of Google docs so everything i used to pay for (email service, word processing, etc) is now free. And you've been around long enough to know that a big service like that being free, can't possibly have any problems, right?

There are two issues, both involving privacy. 1: How secure is your information from being hacked since all of it is sitting in the internet all of the time? I figure it's as secure as your Target credit card account data (insert the name of any of the other credit accounts that have been hacked lately). 2: Is Google itself keeping track of James Emory's information? Is Google making money from that information? Nah - they're just a charitable non-profit that is providing all those huge server farms out of the goodness of their hearts. BTW I have a bridge I can sell you at a very low price.

Going back to your original question, Apple using the term iCloud means they're just being honest. I assume they assume the term is attractive to most folks, who have heard that cloud computing is the latest big thing.

Does it mean that to you, now that you understand it better?

Ted

PS: You can download a free email app for your local computer like Thunderbird and it's not hard to set it up to download your email and then delete it from the Gmail server. But then your handhelds can't get to it while you're roaming so no one does that.
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Old Feb 24, 2014, 2:12 PM   #19
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Encrypt it before storing it "in the cloud". ;-)

Of course, there's no guarantee that the encryption algorithms have not been compromised already, especially using massive computer processing power to help with the decryption process.

But, I'd probably just use something like dm-crypt under linux (using LUKS); or use something like TrueCrypt (available for multiple operating systems) if I were concerned about it. I've got some partitions using encryption, and some that don't. But, I'm in the process of setting up a newer PC now, and I may go ahead and encrypt all data that I save while I'm going through that process (as the CPU overhead isn't that great with newer processors), and make sure any data I store with cloud providers (Google Drive, Dropbox, etc.) has already been encrypted locally first.
Good ideas but not amenable to folks who aren't geeks like us.
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Old Feb 24, 2014, 2:21 PM   #20
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The convenience of using cloud storage is just too tempting (at least to me) as an extra way to protect important data in the event of PC failure, theft, flood, fire, etc.; with prices dropping for cloud storage on a regular basis (more and more storage at a lower cost/GB).

But, yes, the privacy aspect of storing data in the cloud is disturbing, unless you're making sure that data is encrypted locally first (versus relying on the cloud storage providers to handle protection of your data; and given the numerous data theft and compromises we read about in the news all the time, I wouldn't trust that my private data is safe from prying eyes, without encrypting it locally first)
You can actually get yourself completely off the grid (i.e. being traced by anyone) but that's really difficult. You have to pay cash for everything but that means you can't travel (at least via commercial carriers) and you can't buy a car from a car dealer (who has to report you as a potential drug dealer if you pay cash for a car). You have to take that on as a religion and live it every day.
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