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Old Feb 4, 2006, 10:16 PM   #11
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Thanks. My message is on it's way.
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Old Mar 6, 2006, 11:50 PM   #12
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Heads Up People!!!

I received my E1 camera back from the Olympus repair center. They had to replace the CF PCA/Power ST-1 Board. They also adusted and upgraded the firmware. Total cost to fix this bad boy was $160.00.

I'm not real pleased with the performance of this camera to date. I paid close to $1500.00 for it and in less than two years, I'm already making repairs. I still have analog cameras (both medium-format and 35 mm systems) and have never had any problems with either one for over 10 years.

I expect digital cameras are prone to failures just like computers. It's not a question of will it fail but when it will fail. I have noticed a lot of factory refurbished cameras on the web for sale - so that says something.

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Old Mar 7, 2006, 8:16 AM   #13
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Just think how you'd feel if you were some poor sap having to send your camera in for a $100+ sensor cleaning, or a Nikon D70owner having to deal with the blue (or was that black?)screen of death, or some Canon owner getting the error 99 message and finding out all his/her Sigma lenses were too old, incompatible technology and thenfinding out Sigma no longer had chips to fix them, or all the complainers posting about their Canon SD300 cameras' LCD screensmysteriously cracking- good greif, to hear them complain you'd think a few dozen cameras consititutes a majority and everyone should avoid those models at all cost- last time I was scanning that forum I think that unfortunate post was over 100 messages, and growing.

Cameras aren't any different than cars. microwave ovens or anything else man makes. Things go wrong. You could just as well have had a Pentax or Pontiacand had something go wrong. It doesn't take much searching among any other brandsboards to hear someone else complaining about reliability issues.

I've had mechanical analog cameras lock up because it was time for an overhaul, Nikon FE quit because a circuit board went bad and a NikonF2a that had to have the battery box replaced because of a bad connection. You've been as lucky with your analog cameras as you were unlucky with your oneE-1.$160 is cheap- try $500 to overhaul a Hasselblad 500C, 80mm Zeiss Planar and film back. E-1 "refurbs" being sold on eBay by Cameta- a very reputable dealer by the way- thatyou aremaking referenceto were samples that had to go in for generalservice work before they could qualify for the limitedguarantee they come with- not, as youwould make some think,because of some problem they had.what they are doingis no different than Lexus advertizing about "certified Pre-owned" vehicles.

Heads up! You're blowing it a little out of proportion.
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Old Mar 7, 2006, 8:34 AM   #14
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Since posting the original whinge about microdrives and the E1, I have gone on to experience exactly the same problem with an E300 and, this week, the E500. A philosophical question-can anyone think of a convincing reason for using a microdrive as against a CF? I can't. It may be my use of the camera-for mountaineeirng shots-that imposes too much stress on the microdrive, but if that is the case, should we not be told before we buy the things?

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Old Mar 7, 2006, 5:06 PM   #15
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Micro drives stopped making sense when CF card prices started falling. Back in 2003 when it cost $300 for a 1GB Sandisk it was different. Today I'd never considera micro drive. If I was doing any work at high altitudes or other weather extremes I'd buy Sandisk Extreme III CFcard, or at the very minimum the Ultra series ofcards.
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Old Mar 8, 2006, 9:57 AM   #16
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Greg Chappell wrote:
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Micro drives stopped making sense when CF card prices started falling. Back in 2003 when it cost $300 for a 1GB Sandisk it was different. Today I'd never considera micro drive. If I was doing any work at high altitudes or other weather extremes I'd buy Sandisk Extreme III CFcard, or at the very minimum the Ultra series ofcards.
Greg's right. IMO, there's really no reason aside from some kind of penny-wise cost-accounting to think of a microdrive anymore. They just aren't so reliable, and nowhere near so fast, as CF cards. Unfortunately, the E-1 can't take advantage of the Sandisk Extreme III's speed, but all the others can (E-300 with firmware update). I have a couple of Lexar 40x cards bought early on, but they rarely see service anymore since getting my Extreme III cards.

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Old May 2, 2006, 4:53 PM   #17
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I have just bought a new E1 I have a compact flash (new) Kingston make. & a compact flash micromedia xtra plus, Both put int the camera show Card fault. I have not even got taking a photo with it yet
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Old May 2, 2006, 7:57 PM   #18
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Been using a Sandisk 1GB regular (actually use 2 of them) and no problems what so ever. 2 years now.

I also see that the 133X 1, 2 flash are on sale for half price at Adorama ($55 and $110).

Regarding ruggedness of digital. I am pleased that my Olympus is built like a tank after holding the comparably priced Canon and Nikon cameras. However I have no expectation that any digital camera will last as long as my Rolleiflex (given to me by my father who used it professionally in the 1950's). Even my 35mm equipment dates from the mid 70's (Canon A1 stuff) and I think it will still outlast digital stuff.

I just don't think anything with a computer can last that long. Flash memory (where the firmware is) has a finite life. Capacitors have a finite life (typical ratings are 2000 hrs at max specs so derate for use in a camera by 5x and still you are talking about 10000 hours of use only). Electronics have a finite life span.

My first digital camera (that Fuji Finepix that was designed by Porsche) lasted only 1 year and then died. Would cost more to fix than to buy a comparable new model.




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Old May 2, 2006, 8:00 PM   #19
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BTW you are not removing the microdrives while the power to the camera is on are you? You need to power the camera down first.

Second if you want to format the drive, I recommend you do it on your computer (plugged into a USB card reader) and see if that fixes the problem. Do a full format, not a quick one.

If that doesn't fix it, the drive was probably dropped. Main reason not to use them (shock sensitivity).


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