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Old Mar 31, 2006, 9:46 AM   #1
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Let me start with my "other" camera is a Oly C-4000 and has taken some absolutely gorgeous pictures! When I have downloaded them to my computer they "pretty much" looked like the preview on the camera's LCD.

Since I have been taking pics with the E-500...the pics in the LCD look stunning...but when I download them to the computer into Photoshop Elements...they look very dark.

I thought I would print a pic directly from the camera to see how it would turn out...then do it again from the computer...just to see.

I know this must be a "calibration" issue of sorts....but to be honest....I have never had occassion to have to calibrate my monitor.

Any thoughts from all you experts on what might be up?

Thanks for your help!

Randy


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Old Mar 31, 2006, 11:42 AM   #2
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Can you give us more information on your settings? What lens? Did you upgrade firmware and software?
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Old Mar 31, 2006, 12:18 PM   #3
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I have a feeling in the endyou are going to find the problem is notwith your monitor.

Very few images I've taken with a digital SLR, JPEG or not, have been what I would call "finished" images.

LCD'sare very small in terms of actualpixels used to display an image for viewing. I've often found when looking at images on the LCD then on the computer screen the views are completely different, so today I use the camerason-boardLCD for mainly two things- to check composition and to see the histogram to be sure I have not grossly overexposed or underexposed the file.

Remember, point & shoot digicams like your C-4000apply all kinds of extra sharpening and other in-camera adjustments because makers acknowledge the end-users are not the type to want to have to fiddle with after-the-fact adjustments.

Digital SLR's are made just the opposite of point & shoot digicams when it comes to in-camera settings. While consumer models like the E-500 may have slightly more punchy default settings in terms of color and contrast than a camera like the E-1, youare not going tobe able toassume most of your images are going to come out of the camera "finished", but there usually don't need to be more than one or two adjustments to get the look you want:

1. Levels adjustment- Look at the histogram in Elementsand move the right and left-hand sliders until they meet attheir respectiveends of the histogram. If you need to, you can play with the central slider to affect mid tones. Once you make this one adjustment you may findmost images need no further corrections.

2. You might want to check your sharpening settings and maybe tweek those with the USM or Smart Sharpen commands to get the best overall look, but if you do this I would suggest your default in-camerasetting for sharpening not be more than "0"- oversharpeningcan beworse than no sharpening.

You are going to find the need for more post-processing with your E-500 compared to the digicam you were using, and this is typical.


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Old Mar 31, 2006, 3:58 PM   #4
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I never use the LCD on any camera to view picture quality. It never matches the computer. I shoot in RAW mode and adjust it on my workstation.
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Old Mar 31, 2006, 7:16 PM   #5
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Greg,

Excellent advice! Thank you! Yes...I knew I would be much more involved in the post processing than before...and I am enjoying it. I just didnt think there would be that much of a disparity from the LCD to Monitor.
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Old Mar 31, 2006, 9:15 PM   #6
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It surprised me too when I bought my Digital Rebel 3 years ago. Flash shots were the worst. They always looked OK on the LCD, but once transferred to the computer & opened up I almost always had to either add +.5 to +1 exposure compensation in the RAW developer or move the right-hand slider over to the left to meet the end of the histogram. They were consistently underexposed. Once I made the necessary adjustments and saw the resultsit wasn't very long before I dumped the Powershot G5.
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