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Old Apr 3, 2006, 11:58 AM   #21
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The Zuiko f/2 zooms are the brightest in the world for use on a DSLR model with interchangeable lenses. http://www.steves-digicams.com/pr/ol...lenses_pr.html Of course, you could argue that you need the extra stop with the Olympus E Series due to noise differences compared to some competing DSLR models (since you could use an f/2.8 zoom with them at higher ISO speeds). There are pros and cons to any system.
Can you explain it in simpler terms. I will open a new post for this discussion.
mckennma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 3, 2006, 3:58 PM   #22
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About the dust issue: Not having a DSLR, and only reading the variety of opinions on the topic, my interest is in trying to gauge if this is a problem of significance (or not). I'm also pretty unlikely to be shooting F22 of the sky to simply see if there might be dust motes on a sensor. I never bothered to spend a lot of time cleaning my collection of lens either, over the years.

If I were interested in dust as subject matter,I'd probably specialize in shooting pictures of dust directly. That way, dust on the sensor really wouldn't matter. I just don't want to buy into a DSLR setup that has a problem requiring repeated sensor cleaning (I suppose it's possible that some sensors might electrostatically attract dust?). I'm not even sure I'd be changing lens all that often. Greg's comments about there being a shutter and mirror in front of the sensor does suggest that casual dust wouldn't likely be much of an issue.

It seems to me that THE answer to IS is to build it into the camera, as K-M does/did.
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Old Apr 3, 2006, 10:12 PM   #23
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DrummerCT wrote:
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About the dust issue: Not having a DSLR, and only reading the variety of opinions on the topic, my interest is in trying to gauge if this is a problem of significance (or not). I'm also pretty unlikely to be shooting F22 of the sky to simply see if there might be dust motes on a sensor. I never bothered to spend a lot of time cleaning my collection of lens either, over the years.
Really the only thing one can say is "your mileage may vary." I've seen lots of posts on various forums that claim it's not a problem, while others claim it is. When/if you do find dust, it does result in a certain amount of downtime and/or expense for cleaning kits (or professional cleaning). And from what some people say, a lot may depend on individual camera models. I've seen a few claims that the Canon D5 has a particular propensity to attract dust; some suggest it's because of the full-frame 35mm sensor and the correspondingly larger mirror that fans more air with each move, but I've never heard any real statistical evidence. Google for "sensor dust" and you'll get an earfull.
Sure, it can be cloned out, but the worst scenario is going on a vacation (or big job) and only afterward finding that an entire series of photos all have dust in them.
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