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Old Apr 3, 2006, 3:33 PM   #11
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I shoot mainly in Av mode on my Canon S45 and S1 IS. I was able to get great pictures from the bus while moving on Italy's AutoStrada at 50-70 mph. It did not do well in low light. Probably, the size of the CCD and other factors. This is why I am getting the E-500.

I was planning on doing the same with the E-500. I might try burst mode and see how it does. Will it do a good job on shutter speed in Av mode?

I purchased a Wolverine MVP 60GB storage device so I could save and view my pictures. I have not decided on a 1GB (70 RAW pictures) or 2GB (140 RAW pictures) Extreme III. B&H is out of stock on 2GB.

I do have good breath control and a steady footing. I plan on a lot of practice to get used to the weight of the camera and use of its controls.
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Old Apr 3, 2006, 3:41 PM   #12
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mckennma wrote:
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I was planning on doing the same with the E-500. I might try burst mode and see how it does. Will it do a good job on shutter speed in Av mode?
It should give you the same shutter speeds you got with your previous cameras, in the same lighting, if you use the same aperture and ISO speed. ;-)

Your Canon S1 IS could maintain f/2.8 throughout most of it's focal range, and was probably using ISO 200 in Auto ISO. It did have the advantage of stabilization (but, you new Olympus will have higher available ISO speeds).

A stablized lens gives you a 2 to 3 stop advantage. So, you'd probably need to shoot at ISO 800 - 1600 with the Olympus to keep blur from camera shake at the same level you got with the S1 IS at ISO 200 (although the Oly's heavier body may help some).

Sometimes, you see some metering/sensitivity differences between cameras (even though there shouldn't be any sensitivity differences).

But, Light (measured as EV for Exposure Value), Aperture and ISO speed are the three variables that control the fastest shutter speeds a camera can use (and still give you correctly exposed images that aren't too bright or too dark).

If you stay on the wide end of the lenses you have coming, you can keep the aperture at f/2.8 (or not down too much zooming in), then increase your ISO speed to get faster shutter speeds. Each time you double the ISO speed, the camera will use shutter speeds twice as fast for the same lighting and aperture. But, keep noise levels in mind (don't go with any higher ISO speeds than needed).

Again, see the exposure calculator I gave you a link to in my first post to get a better idea of how these variables (Light, ISO speed/film speed, Aperture and Shutter Speed) work together to give you properly exposed images.

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Old Apr 3, 2006, 3:50 PM   #13
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I wish you were the camera store. I would have bought everything from you. Awesome response time.

I plan on playing with the exposure calculator.

Film speed is ISO speed?
Aperture
Shutter speed

ISO 400 with f/2.8 in night home conditions = 1/ 15 shutter speed? I want to write down some basic settings to get a handle on what the camera is doing.
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Old Apr 3, 2006, 3:57 PM   #14
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Yes, Film Speed and ISO speed are the same thing in the calculator I gave you a link to.

Don't assume that light levels are going to be the same as in the examples the calculator has.

Light may be much lower or higher. Since you wanted to understand aperture, I wanted you to see the calculator so that you'd know how Light, ISO speed and Aperture work together for shutter speeds a camera can use.

It's a simple concept.

A larger aperture lets in more light (look at the aperture iris at the bottom of the page on the calculator, and you'll see it opening and closing with aperture choice), just like your eyes' pupils enlarge or shrink with more or less light.

The camera needs to keep the shutter open long enough to "expose" the film or digital camera sensor. So, by letting in more or less light (via the aperture iris), you can "expose" the film or sensor faster or slower (the shutter speed used) for any given lighting condition.

Film speed/ISO speed represents how sensitive the medium is to light. With a digital camera, it accomplishes greater sensitivity by amplifying the sensor's output (which also amplifies noise) Higher ISO speeds require less time to "expose".


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Old Apr 3, 2006, 4:10 PM   #15
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I figured they were not exact between film and digital media. I remember all the different film specs on speeds. I will spend time with it seeing how the different settings affect each other. How well is the CCD on the E-500 under each condition. I will also see what CS2 can do.

First thing is get the camera and latest firmware and software for everything installed before starting to use it. Then review everything you wrote and apply it.

Thank you very much.
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Old Apr 3, 2006, 4:33 PM   #16
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mckennma wrote:
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How well is the CCD on the E-500 under each condition.
Noise shouldn't be much of a problem unless you need to go more than ISO 800 at typical viewing sizes.

The E-500 does have a tendency to soften images at higher ISO speeds to help out with noise when shooting in JPEG. So, raw is probably a better way to go for the most detail, using more sophisticated software to clean up the noise (like Noiseware or Neat Image ).

There are a lot of variables impacting noise.

An evenly lit subject won't have as much as a subject that has a greater range from light to dark (noise is usually worse in underexposed areas). Look at this ISO 800 image as an example. Note that the subject doesn't have a lot of noise in the well exposed areas, but darker areas (like his elbows) have more noise.

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2005_...s/P1010039.JPG

Even the color of a subject can impact noise (noise can be worse in one color channel versus another).

The E-500 would not be my first choice in a camera for taking photos in Museums and Churches if you can't use a flash, tripod or monopod. Competing DSLR models use larger sensors and have lower noise levels (as a general rule, as there are always exceptions).

But, the E-500 is going to be *much* better from a noise perspective compared to the point and shoot models you've been using.

You can see some pretty good ISO 800 examples in it's review here (keeping in mind that your subjects may not be lit as well as in the samples).

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2005_...0_samples.html

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Old Apr 3, 2006, 5:02 PM   #17
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I choose the E-500 based on cost of what I could afford with all the lens I want and amount of use. If I can get that quality, I would be jumping for joy.
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Old Apr 3, 2006, 5:11 PM   #18
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Quality is subjective, and viewing/print sizes also come into the equation (as does the subject and lighting). In low light, noise is usually worse.

Again, at ISO 800, I doubt you'd have much of a problem. If you need to go with ISO 1600, noise will increase.

Software like Noiseware or Neat Image will help clean it up.

Also, make sure you don't underexpose at higher ISO speeds (or noise will be worse after brightening the images with software, just as if you'd used even higher ISO speeds).

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Old Apr 3, 2006, 5:29 PM   #19
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I did not think those apps were needed on RAW only JPG.
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Old Apr 3, 2006, 5:41 PM   #20
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You'll want noise reduction tools at higher ISO speeds shooting in raw (especially at ISO 1600 if you need it).

The camera's image processing is applying some noise reduction with JPEG, but it won't be applying any shooting in raw.

With raw, you bypass the camera's image processing system. So, it's up to you (and your software) to process the data from the sensor (demosaic process, sharpening, noise reduction, etc.).

You'll also see a difference between raw converters in how images are processed. Some will have more noise in images compared to others (and some give you more control of noise reduction versus others).

I'd go with a dedicated tool for noise reduction (versus what's built into raw converters).

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