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Old Jun 26, 2006, 9:50 AM   #1
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Hi, I am totally new to DSLR world, but I am sure that I want one :lol: . I have been using old Oly Camedia 3020 3.1 mp point and shoot, and now that I find myself in need of a better camera I am thinking about E-500 kit with 15-45 and 40-150 lenses. But there are some "drawbacks" that really concern me. The first one is that noise at high ISO (800-1600) because I love photography in very low light, so Nikon D50 is also "on my mind".

So the question wuold be, since I have heard some rumours like "you just don't get those options in other cameras", what options are superior in E-500 if I compare it next to Nikon D50?

And also what is E-500 shutter release limitation?
Finally, your practice with high ISO and low ligh would be appreciated.

Sorry for my english

Thanks in advance
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Old Jun 26, 2006, 11:29 AM   #2
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If low light shooting is your thing, I'd go for the Nikon. Although both cameras are great, the Olympus just doesn't have a strong point in low light shooting, though a lot of people have shot very usable pictures at high ISOs. My personal experience with low light shooting is that Nikons are better at it, this is between an E-300 and a D70. I also like the fact that Nikon uses an AF lamp on their camera instead of illuminating with the flash, since your subjects may find the flash illumination a bit annoying. An external flash would fix this issue though.

One feature Olympus has that Nikon doesn't is the dustbuster. It does add a bit fo time to startup, but by the time the camera is at your eye, dustbuster has done it's thing, the extra startup is never a factor for me and the benefits of dustbuster outweigh any added time.

I'm sure there are a lot more other factors that many people can comment on, these are just two that are important to me. You should, however, go and take a look at both cameras and see which one you like better. The feel of the camera is just as important as any other aspect, if not, the most important.
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Old Jun 26, 2006, 12:53 PM   #3
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For lowlight shooting, if that will constitute the majority of your shooting,the D50 should be your first choice, although I will say, if you utilize good metering technique andwork at getting your exposures right in-camera andnot on fixing things after the fact on the computeryou'd be suprised at the results you can get. I just returned from Paris and shot in many dark cathedrals with the E-300, a camera that is supposed to beinferior in technology to the E-500 and I have to say I have a hard time being happier with the results:

http://gmchappell.smugmug.com/gallery/1547796

The Olympus DSLR's have distinctivefeatures that make them good choices too. The sensor dust cleaner ANDin-camera pixel mapping are both great features you won't find with other brands- go check the various forums. Dirty sensor cleaning and hot pixels seem to be favorite subjects.I also think Olympuskit lenses, especially the 40-150, are better than the competitions kit stuff if all you want to do right now is stay with the basic kit and see where you want to go from there, and Sigma is about to release several of their more popular lenses in evolt mount if you need more options than what Olympus makes.
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Old Jun 28, 2006, 5:36 AM   #4
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Nice pictures, Greg. Do you always carry a tripod around? And how big is it?

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Old Jun 28, 2006, 7:01 AM   #5
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It was heavy enough just carrying those three lenses around. I'm not a huge fan of tripods, so I left the one I own at home. I was more than tired enough each day. I can only imagine whatI would have felt like aftercarrying a tripod too, especially the oneday we walked from the Louvre to theArc, then over to the Madeleine and Opera!What I did do was to utilize every chair back, wall, column or rail I could find.

The wider you go, the easier it is to hold a camera still enough to get acceptable sharpness. There were a few images where I used the 7-14 zoomed to 7mmthat I was able to shoot down to 1/6 second without having to use some sort of support.
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Old Jun 28, 2006, 11:12 AM   #6
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Hello!

I just wanted to throw my 2 cents in here. I am a new E-500 owner and I can share my experience regarding the following:

1) Small View Finder-----------this one has been an absolute non-issue. It is fine.

2) Noise at High ISO's...........I have had great results at 800 ISO. Have not needed to try any higher...so I can't speak to that.

3) LCD screen...........in a word.....GORGEOUS!

4) Menu's are a snap to get around in...the FONT is large and easy for this old blind man to see!

5) Ergonomics----------it just feels so natural in my hands....you just WANT to hold it!

6) Weight--------------it 's light. nuff said.

7) Kit lenses.........arguably the best that are out there! The 40-150 is an outstanding lenses by ALL reports and reviews.

8) Price.....at $699.00 at Sam's Club..couldn't go wrong.

......my choice was also between the E-500....D-50...and Rebel Xt. In my mind...after handling all of them....the choice was clear. For me...for what I knew I needed....the E-500 was hands down...the best choice for me. Having said that....the other two choices are excellent camera's as well...and I bet I would have been happy with either one.










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Old Jun 28, 2006, 3:46 PM   #7
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This forum is really great Thanks for your answers I was also intersted in that AF-Assist lamp that is on Nikon, does it help if spot focusing option is used? In other words - is it really useful or more like a "fancy bonus"?
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Old Jun 29, 2006, 12:02 AM   #8
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Well done, Greg! But 1/10 of a second on some pictures and still sharp! You have a steady hand.

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