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Old Jul 8, 2006, 3:57 AM   #1
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There are yet a number of issues that I am struggling with, regarding my E-500 (which will be addressed here, at a future time, if I have not conquered them myself), but one thing which bewilders me is my inability to select any ISO setting beyond 400. I have been in every mode in trying this (thinking that, maybe, full selectivity would be available in certain modes only) - but all has been to no avail.

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Old Jul 8, 2006, 9:44 AM   #2
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Nathan -

Easy one... Go to "Menu" and scroll down to "Wrench 1". Scroll right and downto "ISO Boost". This is currently set to "Off". Your other choices are "On/Noise Reduction" and "On". Either of these two settings will let you go to a higher ISO (up to ISO 1600.) I leave my E-500 set with ISO Boost to "On". While you're there, scroll down one to "ISO Limit" - this sets the upper ISO limit when you use full "Auto" mode and you may want to set this to "400". This helpslimit noise when you're in the full "Auto" mode. Otherwise, you can now set ISO to whatever you want.

Enjoy your new E-500. It's a great camera!

Paul in NoVA
Olympus E- 500 and C- 730
http://www.flickr.com/photos/stoney_g/sets/

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Old Jul 8, 2006, 11:06 AM   #3
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Just to let you know Olympus' thinking in this regard, beyond ISO400 you're getting into more noise, so for the average and new users they wanted to keep the ISO range in the good quality range.
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Old Jul 8, 2006, 5:26 PM   #4
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Paul & Mike ~ Thanks much.

While up at Niagara Falls, late last night, I had tried desperately to grab a couple of nice photos. My attempts to do so (in the 'Scene/Night' mode) yielded truly terrible results, and I (being a true DSLR fledgling) assumed that a higher ISO setting might serve to afford a more satisfactory outcome.

But let me ask just one more question regarding ISO settings (it may sound stupid, but if you don't know - you don't know). If introduced 'noise' is a concern, over ISO settings above 400, what is the advantage of calling up any ISO settings above 400? Or is this just a negative characteristic of the E-500?

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Old Jul 8, 2006, 5:51 PM   #5
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The advantage of going above ISO400 is being able to get that shot you wouldn't have been able to get at ISO400 (at the cost of image quality). For instance, say you are at your child's concert, you don't have a tripod, and you can't use a flash...you can gain two stops which would allow you to do a handheld shot.

Then when you are at your computer you use a noise reducing program (like Neat Image, Noise Ninja, PureImage, etc.) to reduce the ISO noise.


If you're new to photography, the scene modes that rather limits yourself...the best thing about digital is you can practice shooting without the developing costs you had with film...you should try and expand your ability and learn how to use the aperture priority, shutter priority, and manual modes to expand your creativity.
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Old Jul 9, 2006, 3:45 AM   #6
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Thanks for that explanation, for it has really helped. I don't know about anyone else, but the 'Scene' modes hasn't really worked out that well for me. Though a newbie to DSLR's, I wasn't confident (in the first place) that the 'Scene' mode or 'Auto' settings would be anywhere near what they were cracked up to be. I could be wrong, but that was my feeling; and has been my experience. Tonight, I tried my hand at different ISO settings for the same shot, and saw the differences that were made by each. Though I didn't have time to pull them (the shots) from my card, into the computer, I could see (via the E-500's screen) that the some of the pictures appeared much better looking than what I had been used to viewing there.

And you are absolutely right about there being no excuse to shooting, shooting, and more shooting - while trying different settings. With no film to deal with, and no developing costs to shoulder, it would seem that the only true concern should be within the shutter button's life span :-) (by the way, do you happen to know what the mean life expectancy of the E-500's shutter button is?).

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Old Jul 12, 2006, 3:43 PM   #7
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It's not so much the life of the shutter button that's an issue, it's the life of the actual focal-plane shutter itself (in terms of how many times it will operate (on average) before failure.I've so far been unable to get any info about it.

The 'scene' modes are best avoided if you want to learn about exposure. They do work in ideal conditions most of the time, but you'll learn more by making decisions like that for yourself. Scene modes were provided (same as all entry-level dSLRs) so as to attract the 'point and shoot' snappers who would be frightened off without an 'idiot proof' setting (no offence intended to 'point and shooters'. it's just a fact that's what the manufacturers were thinking when designing it, since the competition do it as well).
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Old Jul 13, 2006, 3:28 AM   #8
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Pip22 ~ Hi.

Just before purchasing my camera, I had read about a lot of concerns regarding different manufactrurer's 'Shutter Action' life expectancy on their models. Then, when I finally purchased my E-500, it was accompanied with a 4-yr accidental coverage plan through Circuit City. With that 'umbrella' I had planned on going stark raving, button-pushing mad :-)- knowing that I was completely covered against ANY malfunction, defect, accident - or whatever. But (thinking about how I take care of my possessions - which is very much 'kid-glove' like) I decided to remove that coverage, and use theat $200+ to purchase a large external hard drive, to use - almost exclusively - for my photographic works. The only thing that I worry about, now, is the 'shutter' concern, but I have decided to just go for the gusto - anyway - and shoot like crazy. I am really going to try and reach well over the max shutter mileage (whatever it may be) before the expiration of the unit's manufacturer's warranty.

And yes...I am avoiding the 'Scene' modes as much as possible. I did use one of them (Fireworks) in Niagara Falls, the other night, but that was mainly because I didn't know, in advance, that they (fireworks) were going to be shot off. And when they were, it was very short (no more than five or six minutes). By the time that I found a semi-decent spot (obstructed as it was, by tree branches) to shoot from, there was only about two minutes left. So I dialed up the "Scene/Fireworks" mode. But I am very quickly finding that 'manual shooting' os indeed the way to go.

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Nathan
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